One early morning in late October, Bellande Lubin washed her shoes in a river near her home town of Les Cayes, Haiti. She was wearing her favorite pastel pink dress, given to her by her mother. The river, used by the community for bathing, washing clothes and as a latrine, was flooded a month earlier by Hurricane Matthew. Lubin’s in fifth grade but can’t return to school because it’s being used as a shelter by some of the tens of thousands who lost their homes to the storm.

Matthew has left 800,000 Haitians in desperate need of food. Along the roads, starving children beg for something to eat. Homeless families sleep under trees. Emergency help is arriving, but there is not enough of it. The United Nations has raised just a third of the $120 million needed to cope with the emergency. Storm-hit areas have reported around 3,500 suspected cholera cases. The death toll stands at 546, but local officials have reported twice that many killed.

Washington Post photographer Sarah Voisin visited the county in late October. Here’s a look at what life is like a month after the devastation of Matthew.

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