Photo Editor

(Jon Lowenstein/NOOR)

(Jon Lowenstein/NOOR)

The next installment of In Sight’s series “PHOTOGRAPHERS edit PHOTOGRAPHERS” pairs NOOR photographers Sebastian Liste and Jon Lowenstein. In this installment, Spanish photographer Liste has made selections from American photographer Lowenstein’s extensive body of work documenting the plight of people living on Chicago’s South Side. Lowenstein isn’t parachuting in for this work — he actually lives in the neighborhood and has dedicated his life to documenting it. Here’s what Liste has to say about his colleague’s work:

“Jon’s work moves you deeply into the lives of those who are part of the forgotten America. those who have been living generation after generation under an oppressive system. [He shows us] The ones who, after centuries of democracy, are still fighting for basic human rights. During his photographic process, he immersed himself into the life of fragmented communities to give them a chance to scream to the world through his art.”

To see more of Lowenstein’s work, visit here. Below is Liste’s selection of  Lowenstein’s photos, accompanied by some of Lowenstein’s own thoughts:


Youth Boxing at Taylor Park on 47th St. At one time this neighborhood was home to America's largest public housing projects the Robert Taylor Homes and Stateway Gardens, but they were dismantled during the past decade in the Chicago Housing Authorities Plan for Transformation. The dissolution of public housing has spread people throughout the South and West side neighborhoods and some people blame the surge in violence with the dislocation, but nobody really knows for sure. Boxing is seen as a positive outlet for young people as they try to navigate the challenging, dangerous and often deadly streets. Chicago’s South Side has experienced major changes over the past decade. Covering more than half the city of Chicago, the area has seen the dissolution of the world’s largest public housing developments, a multi-million dollar rehabilitation of the lakefront area as well as a spike in crime and violence in neighborhoods like Englewood and Little Village—resulting in 49 shootings in month of March alone. Photographer Jon Lowenstein, who recently received a John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship for his decade long project documenting the lives of the people living on the South Side in an attempt to showing the reality in one of the most segregated cities in our country. On assignment for Newsweek/Daily Beast he spent several days photographing the neighborhoods of Englewood and Little Village, among others, to look at the rise in violence and the impact it is having on the people there. (Jon Lowenstein/NOOR)

Youth Boxing at Taylor Park on 47th Street. At one time, this neighborhood was home to America’s largest public housing projects, the Robert Taylor Homes and Stateway Gardens, but they were dismantled during the past decade in the Chicago Housing Authorities Plan for Transformation. The dissolution of public housing has spread people throughout the South and West Side neighborhoods, and some people blame the surge in violence with the dislocation, but nobody really knows for sure. Boxing is seen as a positive outlet for young people as they try to navigate the challenging, dangerous and often deadly streets.


A young woman cools off in Lake Michigan in the South Shore neighborhood on Chicago’s South Side. (Jon Lowenstein/NOOR)

Just minutes after a double shooting a man lies in an alley near the 7100 S. Rhodes block in the Grand Crossing neighborhood on Chicago's South Side. The shooting was in apparent retaliation to a shooting that had happened the previous day. In ‘Chi-Raq’ there is not one trauma unit despite the fact that the city leads the country in the number of homicides, with the majority occurring south of the Loop. As often follows with arrests, incarceration tends to ensue. As a result, more than 100,000 people go through the doors of Chicago’s Cook County Jail each year. However, many of these young men and women are blind to how the city’s methodical and systematic control of land, divides their neighborhoods into war zones. This, results in wars with each other, in a seemingly endless loop of “survival”. Although the violence is consistently reported in the news, to understand what’s at stake we must look far deeper than the latest crime scene. It’s vital that we also show the immense waste of human potential that’s being lost with each violent act. While the violence that has spread to many of Chicago’s most economically depressed neighborhoods is in all ways real, the never ending focus on the violence obscures a larger and far more significant truth: that the wholesale neglect has led to the practical destruction of these communities. The combination of the large scale industrial meltdown, political disinvestment, and the failure of the war on poverty during the 1970’s and 80’s led to communities like Chicago’s South Side falling on extremely hard times. Today, the failure of the war on poverty is clearly evident. The poverty rate for the majority African-Americans stands at 32.6 percent, the highest for the ten largest American cities, according to Chicago Muckrakers. The aftermath is evidenced by failing schools, inadequate public healthcare, mass foreclosures in the form of abandoned and decaying buildings, widespread, but rarely seen hu (Jon Lowenstein/NOOR)

Just minutes after a double shooting, a man lies in an alley near the 7100 S. Rhodes block in the Grand Crossing neighborhood on Chicago’s South Side. The shooting was in apparent retaliation to one that had happened the previous day.

In “Chi-Raq,” there is not one trauma unit despite the fact that the city leads the country in the number of homicides, with the majority occurring south of the Loop. As often happens with arrests, incarceration tends to ensue. As a result, more than 100,000 people go through the doors of Chicago’s Cook County Jail each year. However, many of these young men and women are blind to how the city’s methodical and systematic control of land, divides their neighborhoods into war zones. This, results in wars with each other, in a seemingly endless loop of “survival.”

Although the violence is consistently reported in the news, to understand what’s at stake we must look far deeper than the latest crime scene. It’s vital that we also show the immense waste of human potential that’s being lost with each violent act. While the violence that has spread to many of Chicago’s most economically depressed neighborhoods is in all ways real, the never ending focus on the violence obscures a larger and far more significant truth: The wholesale neglect has led to the practical destruction of these communities.


Hundreds of family and friends attended the funeral of 44-year-old Tania Gist at St. Andrew's Temple in the Englewood on Chicago's South Side. Gist who was shot and killed in the Roseland neighborhood had survived another shooting in 1993. Unfortunately, her son Denzell, who as 15 months old at the time was killed as he was cradled in her arms. Chicago’s South Side has experienced major changes over the past decade. Covering more than half the city of Chicago, the area has seen the dissolution of the world’s largest public housing developments, a multi-million dollar rehabilitation of the lakefront area as well as a spike in crime and violence in neighborhoods like Englewood and Little Village—resulting in 49 shootings in month of March alone. Photographer Jon Lowenstein, who recently received a John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship for his decade long project documenting the lives of the people living on the South Side in an attempt to showing the reality in one of the most segregated cities in our country. On assignment for Newsweek/Daily Beast he spent several days photographing the neighborhoods of Englewood and Little Village, among others, to look at the rise in violence and the impact it is having on the people there. (Jon Lowenstein/NOOR)

Hundreds of family and friends attended the funeral of 44-year-old Tania Gist at St. Andrew’s Temple in Englewood on Chicago’s South Side. Gist, who had survived another shooting in 1993, was shot and killed in the Roseland neighborhood. Her son, Denzell, who was 15 months old at the time, also was killed as he was cradled in her arms.


T-Shirt memorial for three murder victims at Merrill Park in the Jeffrey Manor neighborhood. One of the victims was Janeen Hancock who was shot and killed while watching her son play at the park. July 2012 In ‘Chi-Raq’ more young people have died in the past five years than in Afghanistan and Iraq combined. There still is not one trauma unit anywhere on the South Side, despite the fact that the city leads the country in the number of homicides, with the majority occurring south of the Loop. As often follows with arrests, incarceration tends to ensue. As a result, more than 100,000 people go through the doors of Chicago’s Cook County Jail each year. However, many of these young men and women are blind to how the city’s methodical and systematic control of land, divides their neighborhoods into war zones. This, results in wars with each other, in a seemingly endless loop of “survival”. Although the violence is consistently reported in the news, to understand what’s at stake we must look far deeper than the latest crime scene. It’s vital that we also show the immense waste of human potential that’s being lost with each violent act. While the violence that has spread to many of Chicago’s most economically depressed neighborhoods is in all ways real, the never ending focus on the violence obscures a larger and far more significant truth: that the wholesale neglect has led to the practical destruction of these communities. The combination of the large scale industrial meltdown, political disinvestment, and the failure of the war on poverty during the 1970’s and 80’s led to communities like Chicago’s South Side falling on extremely hard times. Today, the failure of the war on poverty is clearly evident. The poverty rate for the majority African-Americans stands at 32.6 percent, the highest for the ten largest American cities, according to Chicago Muckrakers. The aftermath is evidenced by failing schools, inadequate public healthcare, mass fore (Jon Lowenstein/NOOR)

T-shirt memorial for three murder victims at Merrill Park in the Jeffrey Manor neighborhood. One of the victims was Janeen Hancock, who was shot and killed while watching her son play in the park.


Nelson Mandela and Malcolm X. Candy Store. (Jon Lowenstein/NOOR)

A protester who was beaten and arrested by the polices lies bloodied on the pavement of Cermak Road on Chicago's South Side after protesting the NATO Summit. Protesters clash with police at the intersection of Cermak and S. Michigan Avenue on Chicago's near South Side. The protesters had just finished a mostly peaceful march led by the Iraq Veterans Against the War when the protest turned into a more confrontational situation between police and the marchers. The situation had been brewing for a number of days as protesters from outside Chicago gathered to voice their displeasure for the actions of the North American Treaty Organization. The Chicago Police Department were joined by many other police forces from the surrounding area and states including the Illinois State Police. Their numbers massed more than an estimated 1000 officers throughout the area in anticipation of the planned event. The show of all out force was arguably the largest witnessed in decades in the Windy City. Originally, the G8 and the NATO were planned for this week, but President Obama nixed the idea and moved the G8 to Camp David on the East Coast of the United States. I have spent more than a decade documenting life on Chicago's South Side and seen the impact on the community of the consistent and unending police presence in Chicago's poorest neighborhoods many of which exist less than a mile from where the NATO took place. It was important to document this historic moment in which police and protesters clashed. (Jon Lowenstein/NOOR)

A demonstrator who was beaten and arrested by the police lies bloodied on the pavement of Cermak Road on Chicago’s South Side after protesting the NATO Summit in 2012. The demonstrators had just finished a mostly peaceful march led by the Iraq Veterans Against the War when the protest turned into a more confrontational situation between police and the marchers. The situation had been brewing for a number of days as protesters from outside Chicago gathered to voice their displeasure for the actions of the North American Treaty Organization. The Chicago Police Department was joined by many other police forces from the surrounding area and states, including the Illinois State Police. Their numbers massed more than an estimated 1,000 officers throughout the area in anticipation of the planned event. The show of all-out force was arguably the largest witnessed in decades in the Windy City.

I have spent more than a decade documenting life on Chicago’s South Side and seen the impact on the community of the consistent and unending police presence in Chicago’s poorest neighborhoods, many of which exist less than a mile from where the NATO event took place. It was important to document this historic moment in which police and protesters clashed.


This past year saw increased bloodshed in Chicago's. An almost 20% rise in murders pushed the total murders to 506 for 2012. Chicago’s South Side has experienced major changes over the past decade. Covering more than half the city of Chicago, the area has seen the dissolution of the world’s largest public housing developments, a multi-million dollar rehabilitation of the lakefront area as well as a spike in crime and violence in neighborhoods like Englewood and Little Village. Photographer Jon Lowenstein, who recently received a John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship for his decade long project documenting the lives of the people living on the South Side in an attempt to showing the reality in one of the most segregated cities in our country. (Jon Lowenstein/NOOR)

More In Sight:

These photos show life for displaced typhoon victims forced into the sex trade

One photographer’s view of President Trump’s first 100 days

These opulent villas are 50 miles from the Islamic State’s front line in Mosul