Last week, Melania Trump began calling Washington, D.C., home, giving the nation’s capital something in common with the small, hilly Slovenian town of Sevnica.

With a population of only 5,000, the town was mostly known for its red wine and dry sausages, The Washington Post’s Rick Noack reported last year. But that was before Melania became known to the world. “Melania Trump put the name of our town on the map of the world,” Mayor Srecko Ocvirk said last year.

“Melania made it from the small town of Sevnica…. By some, Melania is celebrated as a goddess,” Slovenian photographer Matic Zorman told In Sight. Zorman explored Trump’s home town and all the various things named after her while on assignment for The Post. Here’s what he found:


Sevnica is located in southeastern Slovenia, encircled by numerous hills overlooking the town and farm lands on its outskirts. (Matic Zorman for The Washington Post)

A cake named after Melania Trump is one of the most desired and popular sweets in Sevnica, according to the saleswoman in one of the bakeries in the town. After Donald Trump was elected president, honey, slippers various sweets and fast-food packets were either named or renamed to mark Trump’s presidency and to celebrate Melania Trump as first lady. (Matic Zorman for The Washington Post)

A view of the train station in Sevnica from a window of a pub. Daily, locals commute from Sevnica to Ljubljana, Slovenia’s capital, to work or to study at university, a trip that takes about an hour and a half. (Photo by Matic Zorman for The Washington Post)

In Ljubljana, Stane Jerko, the renowned Slovenian photographer who discovered the modeling talent of Melania Knauss in January 1987. They worked together on a test photo shoot, and Jerko subsequently photographed her for her model book, which served as a springboard to the world of fashion. (Matic Zorman for The Washington Post)

Stane Jerko, displays photographs of Melania Knauss he shot at the beginning of her career as a fashion model. (Matic Zorman for The Washington Post)

A child walks on the catwalk in Sevnica during an event in which local salami producers gather to present their salamis and compete for the best salami produced in the past year. Only women are allowed entrance to this event, which was created because the traditional event known as Salamijadaas prohibits women from attending. (Matic Zorman for The Washington Post)

Apartments in Sevnica last December. (Matic Zorman for The Washington Post)

An apple pie named “Prva dama” or “First lady” is displayed in one of the bars in town. Locals claim that Prva dama pie is made of “Sevniška voščenka,” a variety of apple known only to Sevnica. (Matic Zorman for The Washington Post)

Weightlifters at one of two gyms in Sevnica. (Matic Zorman for The Washington Post)

The Sevnica Castle. First mentioned in the first half of 14th century, it now holds a bar, gallery, museums and a puppet show performance group named after it.  (Matic Zorman for The Washington Post)

Locals walk in the park in front of the Sevnica Castle.  (Matic Zorman for The Washington Post)

The house where Melania Trump lived with her family in Sevnica, before moving to Slovenia’s capital, Ljubljana, where she studied. The house photographed in December appeared to be unoccupied. (Matic Zorman for The Washington Post)

Locals visit the reenactment of the nativity of Jesus, held on Christmas Day in a village. (Matic Zorman for The Washington Post)

The reenactment of the nativity of Jesus. (Matic Zorman for The Washington Post)

A new brand of salami called First Lady photographed in March at a local event where local salami producers compete for the best salami produced in the past year. (Matic Zorman for The Washington Post)

The old part of Sevnica as seen from the Sevnica Castle. (Matic Zorman for The Washington Post)

 

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