Chanting “White lives matter!” and “You will not replace us!” and “Jews will not replace us!” several hundred white nationalists and white supremacists carrying torches marched in a parade through the University of Virginia campus Aug. 11. The march, which began a little after 9:30 p.m., lasted 15 to 20 minutes before ending in skirmishing when the marchers were met by a small group of counterprotesters at the base of a statue of Thomas Jefferson, the university’s founder. (Evelyn Hockstein for The Washington Post)

Several hundred white nationalists and white supremacists carrying torches marched in a parade through the University of Virginia campus Aug. 11. (Evelyn Hockstein for The Washington Post)

Evelyn Hockstein is an award-winning photojournalist who has covered global and national events in more than 70 countries. She is a contributing photographer for The Washington Post and the vice president of Women Photojournalists of Washington. She has done many assignments for The Post, including the inauguration of President Trump, the Women’s March, and a week-long series examining campus sexual assault across the United States.

In August, Hockstein was on assignment for The Post to cover the “Unite the Right” march in Charlottesville, one of the largest gatherings of neo-Nazi, Ku Klux Klan and white nationalists in more than a decade. As hundreds of demonstrators arrived to protest the removal of a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee, Hockstein witnessed a clash that reminded her of her previous conflict coverage in the Middle East, Kenya and Sudan.

Charlottesville, which now stands as a transformative moment in our culture, also had a profound impact on her. “I prepared myself to witness this horrific display of racism and hate, focused on America’s ugly legacy of slavery and Jim Crow. But I was also shocked by the anti-Semitism on display,” she said. “Even though I was there taking pictures, it was almost impossible to believe this was happening in 2017. It was like being in Nazi Germany, but it was happening right here in Virginia.”

A selection of her work, along with work by Mark Peterson, Ruddy Roye, Hilary Swift and a video by Nina Berman, will be exhibited at Photoville in Brooklyn, N.Y., on Sept. 13-24, 2017. This is the sixth annual festival of photography at the Brooklyn Bridge Plaza. Photoville hosts the work of more than 500 visual artists and offers hands-on workshops, nighttime projections, panel discussions and education events for middle- and high-school students in New York.


Tensions rise at the Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville on Aug. 12. (Evelyn Hockstein for The Washington Post)

Ben, a 21-year-old KKK member from Harrison, Ark., in Emancipation Park before the Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville on Aug. 12.(Evelyn Hockstein for The Washington Post)

A confrontation at the Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville on Aug. 12. (Evelyn Hockstein for The Washington Post)

Clashes at the Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville on Aug. 12. (Evelyn Hockstein for The Washington Post)

A memorial at the site of the deadly car attack in Charlottesville on Aug. 13. (Evelyn Hockstein for The Washington Post)

A section of the memorial at the site of the deadly car attack in Charlottesville on Aug. 13. (Evelyn Hockstein for The Washington Post)

At the memorial at the site of the deadly car attack in Charlottesville on Aug. 13. (Evelyn Hockstein for The Washington Post)

At the memorial at the site of the deadly car attack in Charlottesville on Aug. 13. (Evelyn Hockstein for The Washington Post)

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