Alixandra Fazzina is a photographer whose great impact has been through exposing the treacherous journeys that migrants and refugees face because of conflict. And yet in capturing these streams of people, she never forgets about the individual.

This is what Fazzina’s colleague, Benedicte Kurzen, noticed through editing her work for our latest installment of the In Sight series “PHOTOGRAPHERS edit PHOTOGRAPHERS.”

“This is exactly what lies at the core of any large migrations,” she said. “It is a personal adventure within a mass movement.”

Kurzen focused on Fazzina’s work on Afghan children and their dangerous journeys to seek refuge in European countries, “Flowers of Afghanistan.”

Even in the most unexceptional places, seismic shifts in these children’s lives take place. “The canvas of this dream becomes a never-ending succession of spaces, caves, darkness, small fires, piles of shoes, cold, car parks, alone and together at the same time,” Kurzen said.

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In Sight is The Washington Post photography blog for visual narrative. This platform showcases compelling and diverse imagery from staff and freelance photographers, news agencies and archives. If you are interested in submitting a story to In Sight, please complete this form.

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