Google Glass winners, which the company calls “explorers,” set some lofty goals when they appealed to the search giant for a shot at trying Glass.

Michigan fans cheer before the first half of the NCAA Final Four tournament college basketball championship game against the Louisville, Monday, April 8, 2013, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)
Michigan fans cheer before the first half of the NCAA Final Four tournament college basketball championship game against the Louisville, Monday, April 8, 2013, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)

Among those goals, were showing the National World War II Memorial to veterans in far away hospitals, taking family members on virtual international vacations, and even improving firefighter safety.

None of those things have been captured via Glass—at least not yet. What has been recorded are a growing number of first-person action videos, especially sports.

If you’ve ever wondered what it’s like to play hockey, then check out Glass user Joseph Lallouz’s video, which demonstrates what a game looks like through the eyes of someone on the rink:

If chasing a puck isn’t your thing, then try some basketball:

You can also ride a motorcycle:

Or play Pachelbel’s Kanon with a violin group:

The trend is notable considering an observation from Wired’s Marcus Wohlsen that Google Glass may fall prey to the same image problem as the Segway and the Bluetooth headset. Perhaps this emerging video trend of athletes-wearing-Glass may help mitigate that. Disagree? Let us know in the comments.

If you are curious as to how the Google Glass actually works, then you’re in luck. Former Washington Post staff member Michael Evans recently brought the technology to the Post and showed it off for The Fold.