Here’s what we’re reading/watching Friday:

Apple CEO Tim Cook testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, May 21, 2013, before the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Permanent subcommittee on Investigations. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
Apple CEO Tim Cook testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, May 21, 2013, before the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Permanent subcommittee on Investigations. (J. Scott Applewhite/AP)

1)  In case you missed it, Stanford University fellow and Washington Post columnist Vivek Wadhwa was on the “PBS NewsHour” last night. In his column for Innovations, Wadhwa outlined the competition for highly-skilled immigrants — a competition that today, Wadhwa and others find, the United States is losing. Wadhwa spoke with the “Newshour’s” Ray Suarez about the nature of the immigration debate as it concerns highly-skilled workers, the nature of the current immigration system for those workers and how it stands to change:

2) Wired’s Jimmy Stamp has an interesting piece and gallery feature on big tech companies’ embrace of “big architecture” in the design of their headquarters. Notably, Stamp writes:

“…more interesting, the complexes suggest a shift in Silicon Valley culture away from the collegiate “campus,” beloved for its informality and appeal to young geniuses, and toward architectural monuments to zillion-dollar enterprises.”

3) So, you want to ditch law school and work for a start-up? Forbes contributor David Tao has a list of nine lessons he has learned from his time in the start-up world working for health-and-fitness start-up Greatist. No. 1? “You will get to innovate.” Also, in case you missed it, former eBay COO Maynard Webb has six rules for employers eager to hold on to top talent and, of course, to stay innovative.

4) For your listening pleasure (or displeasure), here is Daft Punk’s “Random Access Memories” in 8-bit”. Let the remixing continue:

5) This was a week of calls for change. Whether it was the U.S. tax code, immigration or the nation’s counterterrorism policy, people (both in front of the microphone and not) called for change, with a varying degree of detail as to what those changes could or should look like. We want to open up the comments today and through the weekend for suggestions on how the U.S. tax code should be changed, the types of changes that need to be made at the IRS and whether Obama’s planned changes to the nation’s counterterrorism policy go far enough (or not). And, of course, have a great weekend!