Bus stops are a universal part of the human experience. Whether you’re in South America,

South Africa,

Crimea,

or Iraq.

Marketers noticed bus stops had a captive audience and started incorporating ads.

For example, this bus stop in India.

Technology also arrived, such as this pay phone.

Now some of us are alerted when the next bus will arrive.

It’s not unheard of for $1 million to be spent on heated floors and stainless steel benches.

Caption: ARLINGTON, VA - MARCH 21: Arlington County's new $1 million busstop on Columbia Pike and Walter Reed Drive Thursday March 21, 2013. The stop features an electronic bus tracking map, is larger than the standard stop and has a more modern design. However, the open design does not always keep rain off the heads of those waiting. (photo by Dayna Smith/for the Washington Post).

Arlington County’s $1 million bus stop on Columbia Pike and Walter Reed Drive features an electronic bus tracking map, is larger than the standard stop and has a more modern design. (Dayna Smith for the Washington Post). (related story)

In other parts of the world, there’s much less.

In some corners of the world, bus stops are examples of remarkable creativity.

They sometimes act as hubs of religion.

No matter the faith.

Now marketers are incorporating augmented reality into the experience, like this must-see Pepsi campaign.

In one stunt, Qualcomm picked up people waiting in a Lamborghini.

It did the same with a horse and carriage.

And even a dog sled.

We haven’t seen the best a bus stop can be yet. So what’s next?