Google Autocomplete knows what anyone who has framed a picture is thinking. (Screenshot)

A few years ago, I wanted to have a print framed so I bought a Groupon for a local framing store. The deal was something like $150 of framing for only $50. I figured it couldn’t be that expensive. So I showed up at the store with my coupon and print. An employee helped me pick a matte and frame that worked well. Then we went to the cash register.

Even with my coupon, the price was more than $300. I was shocked. How can a frame and a piece of glass be so expensive? I ended up going without a matte and getting one of the cheapest frames.

So when I needed to get a more respectable frame for this print, I was determined to find a better way. I checked out a few online framing sites before rolling the dice on Framebridge.


(Matt McFarland/The Washington Post)

I found the Web site simple and easy to use. You can upload your image and see what it looks like in a variety of frames. The prices were also a lot more reasonable. (I paid $136.42 for a print that was about 28 by 23 inches.)


(Screenshot)

A few days after I completed my order, a cardboard tube showed up on my doorstep.


(Matt McFarland/The Washington Post)

Inside were instructions that were easy to follow.


(Matt McFarland/The Washington Post)

I rolled up the print, put it in a plastic sleeve and slipped it in the cylinder. I was a little worried about creasing the print, but didn’t.


(Matt McFarland/The Washington Post)

Then I taped the ends as instructed. Framebridge sent all the supplies I needed.


(Matt McFarland/The Washington Post)

Next I added an address label.


(Matt McFarland/The Washington Post)

Then I biked to my local UPS store.


(Matt McFarland/The Washington Post)

Where I left the cylinder with an employee.


(Matt McFarland/The Washington Post)

Six days later, a box appeared on my front porch. The painting had arrived safely.


(Matt McFarland/The Washington Post)

Mission complete! There was no trek across D.C. to an overpriced store. Just a simple and easy process. My phobia of framing prints is officially dead.


(Matt McFarland/The Washington Post)

Related: Framebridge raises $1.25 million; meet founder Susan Tynan