Bruce Stonerock, 9, of Grand Terrace, Calif., rests on a portion of the sculpture named “The Awakening,” as he is framed between the Capital Wheel at National Harbor, left, and the arm of the artwork, right, on July 30 in National Harbor. (Matt McClain/ The Washington Post)

Atlanta Black Star, an online publication, has named five Prince George’s County neighborhoods to its list of the “Richest Black Communities in America.”

The story, published Jan. 3, lists: Fort Washington, Friendly, Kettering, Mitchellville and Woodmore among the wealthiest black communities in the country.

Other communities on the list include: Baldwin Hills, Ladera Heights and Windsor Hills in California; and Uniondale in New York.

Atlanta Black Star described Woodmore, with a family income of $103,438, as “one of the wealthiest African-American communities in the United States.” It noted that Kettering was thriving. The writers called Fort Washington “an upper-middle-class Black community … home to families with children, young professionals and college students. More than a third of residents have a bachelor’s or advanced college degree.”

The editors described Mitchellville “as an upper-middle-class African-American community in Maryland,” whose residents “take tremendous pride in their friendly community and beautiful homes.”

The community of Friendly landed on the 8th spot on the list. “Friendly’s average family income is $82,827, solidifying its place as an affluent African-American community in the United States,” the publication said.

Barry L. Hudson, a senior policy adviser to the county executive, said county officials were pleased neighborhoods had been recognized.

“We constantly talk about how great a county Prince George’s is to live in,” Hudson said. “That article highlights five of the many communities we have within our borders. It supports the notion we say all the time: ‘We are one of the most affluent African-American counties in the country. When you have five of the ten communities on the list, it shows Prince George’s county is a desirable place for not just African Americans but for all people.”


Prince George’s County Executive Rushern L. Baker III (D). ( Jeffrey MacMillan/For The Washington Post)

In November, Prince George’s County officials launched a $500,000 “re-branding” campaign to increase awareness of the county’s  tourist attractions, new housing developments and to draw more economic investment.

The ad campaign was launched over radio, billboards and social media to boost perceptions about the county of more than 900,000 residents. The slogan “Experience, Expand, Explore” appeared in ads on Metro trains and Metro stations inside and outside the county, and on billboards in terminals at Reagan National and Baltimore-Washington International Marshall airports.

“We are not just taking off, we are telling our story. We are telling it loud, bold and proud,” said Prince George’s County Executive Rushern L. Baker III while launching the campaign at National Harbor, where a new Ferris wheel twirled, the Awakening sculpture of a giant emerged from a sandy beach, and yachts bounced on the Potomac.

Baker listed new developments, including the Tanger Outlets mall, the $925 million MGM resort and casino, and a regional health center in Largo. The county is also lobbying to land the new FBI headquarters.

A 2014 report by Phoenix Marketing International found that Maryland had the highest rate of millionaires in the country. The report found that nearly 8 out of every 100 households had assets over $1 million.

Perry Stein wrote in a recent Washington Post story that the District and Virginia ranked in the top 10 among those with the highest number of millionaire households per capita. Virginia ranked number 6 on the list. The District rounded out the top 10, with 6.25 percent of its more than 292,000 households are millionaires.