Hillary Clinton, her daughter, Chelsea, and former president Bill Clinton participate in the Bicentennial Homecoming worship at the Foundry United Methodist Church in Washington on Sept. 13. (Melina Mara/The Washington Post)

Ward 2 D.C. Council member Jack Evans has long been a supporter of Bill and Hillary Clinton. He was the D.C. co-chair of Hillary Clinton’s 2008 campaign and co-chaired Bill Clinton’s presidential campaigns in D.C. in 1992 and 1996.

And this weekend, Evans took to the high-profile pulpit at Foundry United Methodist Church to show his love for the presidential candidate in person. Hillary and Chelsea Clinton delivered the keynote speeches for the church’s 200-year anniversary service Sunday. The Clintons attended the church on 16th Street NW when Bill Clinton was president.

[Hillary Clinton talks about faith and family to mark D.C. churches 200th anniversary]

Evans and At-Large council member Anita Bonds are both longtime attendees of the church and read aloud a D.C. Council resolution prior to the Clinton speeches declaring Sept. 13 “Foundry United Methodist Church Day” in D.C.

Evans then took the time to say that his triplets had just turned 18 and can now vote for Hillary Clinton.

“My triplets are now 18 years old, so what does that mean? They can all vote for you,” Evans said Sunday. Evan’s triplets are freshmen in college.

When Clinton took the stage, she said she remembers being at Foundry church for the children’s baptism.

“They are all big Hillary fans, so after the service yesterday I sent them pictures of Hillary at the church and told them that she mentioned them and they were all very excited about that,” Evans said in an interview Monday.

Evans said he and Bonds are the unofficial co-chairs of Clinton’s 2016 campaign in D.C. and, because the D.C. primary is so late, in June — the nominee will likely have been chosen by then — they will instead be working to try and get Clinton support in Virginia.

“Organizing the District on behalf of Democrats in Virginia will probably be the more important thing to do,” Evans said.

Evans said he assumes that if Clinton is elected president, the first family will once again be regulars at Foundry.

“We are looking forward to having the Clintons back at church,” he said.