Greg Metzger, left, helps to secure a blue shark. Next to him, Matt Ajemian, a research professor at Florida Atlantic University, takes blood and tissue samples. (Ricky Carioti/The Washington Post)

A 12-foot great white shark has been tracked near the Delmarva coast.

The shark, weighing 1,668 pounds, is named Miss Costa, after a sunglass company that supports Ocearch, a nonprofit that tracks and researches sharks.

Miss Costa was tagged by the research group in September 2016 off the Nantucket, Mass., coast. On Wednesday, the Ocearch crew detected a ‘ping’ from tracking equipment on her off the Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge.

A ‘ping’ happens when a shark’s dorsal fin breaks the water’s surface, which leads tracking and satellite equipment to get information about its location.

Miss Costa is one of the first sharks to ‘ping’ off the Delmarva coast since the summer, experts said.

Ocearch catches great white sharks, takes samples for research, and releases them. It shares its shark-tracking data online in real time. Some of the sharks have ‘pinged’ within a few miles of popular beaches in Maryland and Virginia. A few have their own Twitter accounts and get nicknames after Ocearch’s sponsors.


Miss Costa, a roughly 1,600-pound great white shark, “pinged” recently off the Delmarva coast. (Courtesy of Ocearch)

One shark goes by the Twitter handle @Shark_Katherine. Her profile reads “misunderstood but sassy girl just tryin’ to get some fish.”

Mary Lee is one of Ocearch’s most popular great white sharks. She pinged several times last summer off Chincoteague and Assateague islands and within two miles of Cape Henlopen State Park in Lewes, Del.

Chris Fischer, who founded the nonprofit organization 10 years ago, was the star of the TV show “Shark Wrangler.” Mary Lee is named after his mother.