Kim Kardashian in Miami Beach, Fla., on March 12, 2014. (Omar Vega/Invision/AP)

When another round of hacked naked photos of celebrities included Jennifer Lawrence, Oscar-winning star of “The Silver Linings Playbook” and “The Hunger Games” trilogy, Internet outrage was palpable.

“Jennifer Lawrence has been victimized once again by a hacker intent on releasing stolen nude photos of female celebrities,” Amanda Mitchell of Hollywood Life wrote.

But when alleged naked photos of Kim Kardashian were leaked along with those photos of Lawrence, the Internet had another reaction: blame.

Some news stories about the hack pointed out Kardashian’s long history of appearing in her birthday suit. Here’s Fox citing a recent interview with British GQ — on whose cover the star appeared naked:

This isn’t the first time Kardashian has been linked to a racy scandal. She became a household name in 2007 when a sex tape she made with then-boyfriend Ray J five years earlier was made public. In a recent interview with British GQ the reality star admitted she doesn’t want a repeat of that incident.

“My husband Kanye and I have an amazing sex life,” she gushed. “So far as the sex tape is concerned, whether or not we’ve made another … If we have, it’s never something I want to go public.”

But that history isn’t relevant, right? This hack was a criminal act in which private images were made available to the public without the star’s consent.

Right?

Many have chosen to point out that some of these celebrities have already posed naked in the past; however, that was their choice,” Mitchell wrote. “Having their phones hacked was not their choice, nor was having their private photos unleashed to the world. (Don’t be that person who blames the victim!)”

That wasn’t the only opinion on the Web site Reddit, where some of the photos appeared — and where some speculated the photos might be part of a publicity stunt.

“She’s posed rude for magazines numerous times and has a fun tape but the latest photos of Kim Kardashian are ‘leaked’?” one user posted. “Sure.”

Even “American Idol” turned North Carolina Democratic congressional candidate Clay Aiken spoke out earlier this month about those who must reap the wages of sin for taking nude selfies.

“Anybody who takes inappropriate pictures of themselves deserves exactly what they get,” Aiken said in an interview with The Washington Post — before clarifying that those who leaked the photos should be “hogtied.”

Kardashian has not responded to the hack yet — though she did appear in an episode of the Fox animated series “American Dad” last night.

Perhaps a response like Megan Good’s will earn Kardashian some defenders. After photos of Good leaked, Good posted to Instagram: “I ‘choose’ not to give the persons responsible my power.”

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