California Attorney General Kamala Harris backed California’s “revenge porn” law. (AP)

Kevin Bollaert, a 28-year-old Web developer from San Diego, created UGotPosted.com in December 2012. The site occupied one of the Internet’s seediest niches, inviting men to submit naked images of their former lovers as “revenge” for a breakup. By the time it was taken down the following year, the site included photos of more than 10,000 people, mostly women. The images were often accompanied by identifying personal information and links to the subject’s social media accounts.

A 20-year-old woman from Reno, Nev., whose pictures appeared on the site told CNN affiliate KFMB in 2013 that she was “a wreck” after finding the images of herself online.

“That’s me, that’s my personal nakedness, and everyone can see it now,” she said.

Bollaert used a second site, ChangeMyReputation.com, to demand money from the women whose pictures were posted in exchange for taking them down. Prosecutors said he charged up to $350 per person and made tens of thousands of dollars from the site.

In an unprecedented case, Bollaert was found guilty of more than two dozen felony charges Monday. He was arrested in December 2013, two months after California passed a law criminalizing revenge porn.

“I don’t feel like I’ve committed any crime,” he said after he was charged. He added: “I understand that a lot of people would be upset by what would happen and be hurt.”

“This is essentially 21st-century blackmail,” Deputy Attorney General Tawnya Austin told jurors at Bollaert’s trial last week.

Bollaert’s lawyer argued her client was simply a Web developer and not responsible for the content of what was posted on his site. Technically, the California statute against revenge porn only applies to the person who took the photo, not to anyone who redistributes it.

Regardless, Bollaert was found guilty on 21 counts of identity theft and six of extortion. His conviction is not the first under the new law — another California man was sentenced to a year in prison last December for posting a topless photo of his ex-girlfriend on her employer’s Facebook page. But he is apparently the first site operator to be convicted.

Bollaert now faces up to 20 years in prison.

Some 17 states have laws aimed at punishing “revenge porn” — a term some find offensive because it suggests victims were somehow in relationships with perpetrators. California Attorney General Kamala Harris has suggested “cyber exploitation” as a better term.

The American Civil Liberties Union opposed the law when it was being debated in California, saying that “the posting of otherwise lawful speech or images even if offensive or emotionally distressing is constitutionally protected. The speech must constitute a true threat or violate another otherwise lawful criminal law, such as stalking or harassment statute, in order to be made illegal. The provisions of this bill do not meet that standard.”