(ADL)
The tapestry for sale at Urban Outfitters. (Anti-Defamation League)

The Anti-Defamation League is urging fashion retailer Urban Outfitters to stop selling a gray-and-white striped tapestry with pink triangles that is reminiscent of the garb that gay men were forced to wear in Nazi concentration camps.

(ADL) The tapestry for sale at Urban Outfitters. (Anti-Defamation League)

ADL National Director Abraham H. Foxman wrote to Urban Outfitters chief executive Richard Hayne to urge the retailer to remove the item.

“Whether intentional or not, this gray and white striped pattern and pink triangle combination is deeply offensive and should not be mainstreamed into popular culture,” Foxman said in a statement. “We urge Urban Outfitters to immediately remove the product eerily reminiscent of clothing forced upon the victims of the Holocaust from their stores and online.”

The tapestry was found at an Urban Outfitters store in a Boulder, Colo., ADL said. It was being sold for $69 as part of the “Assembly Home” line.

It isn’t the first time that the clothier and other retailers have been blasted for using designs too similar to Nazi garb.

The store once carried a T-shirt featuring the Star of David, which the company later said was never meant for sale.

And Spanish clothing store Zara apologized for selling a striped shirt with a Star of David that was also similar to Holocaust clothing.

A spokeswoman for Urban Outfitters did not immediately respond to a request for comment.


(Anti-Defamation League)

 

An example of the uniforms gay male prisoners in Nazi concentration camps were made to wear. (YouTube)
An example of the uniforms gay male prisoners in Nazi concentration camps were made to wear. (YouTube)
It seems like every few weeks, Urban Outfitters is in the news for some new controversy. Today, it's for a blood-red-stained Kent State sweatshirt. (The Washington Post)

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