The inside of a newly unearthed tomb belonging to Amenhotep, the guard of one of the most powerful gods in ancient Egypt, Amun. (SCA/Agence France-Presse via Getty Images)

Back in the day, Egyptians had a lot of gods. To those of us living in the modern era without degrees in archaeology, their names are perhaps most familiar from pop schlock like “Raiders of the Lost Ark” making hay with Egypt-y stuff: Ra, Geb, Shu, Osiris, Set, et cetera.

But then there was Amun. In ancient Egyptian mythology — we’re talking 3,000 years ago here — Amun was the king of the gods: the Jupiter, the Zeus, the Odin, the Big Kahuna.

Amun was important enough to have a temple — that goes without saying. But Amun was so important that the guardian of that temple, a nobleman named Amenhotep, got a fancy tomb. And photographs of that tomb have just been released by Egypt’s antiquities ministry.

“The tomb contains many stunning scenes with bright colours painted on plaster,” antiquities minister Mamdouh Eldamaty said in a statement, as Reuters reported.

He was right. This real estate comes in stunning brown and green with hieroglyphics that won’t quit.


(SCA/Agence France-Presse via Getty Images)

The tomb, discovered more than 400 miles from Cairo in the city of Luxor, is likely from Egypt’s 18th Dynasty (1543–1292 B.C.), when most of the pharaohs the 21st century knows and loves — particularly King Tutankhamun, a.k.a. “Tut” — rocked and rolled along the Nile.

“Many of scenes represent the tomb owner and his wife in front of an offering table and a view of a goddess nursing a royal child as well as scenes of the daily life,” Eldamaty said.

According to the Associated Press, the antiquities ministry said the tomb was discovered by an American research team, but gave no date for the finding.

But just like American Idols, gods can’t stay popular forever. Unfortunately, an enemy of Amun — or Amenhotep — vandalized the tomb in ancient times. Unless the culprit was just an obnoxious teenager trying to look cool.

“The name and titles of the tomb owner, some hieroglyphic texts and scenes in addition to the names of the god Amun were deliberately erased,” said Sultan Eid, the ministry’s general director for the Upper Egypt region.

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