Two Transportation Security Administration screeners have been fired following accusations that they manipulated the security system at Denver International Airport so that one of them, a man, could grope “attractive” male passengers coming through the checkpoint, according to news reports.

CBS Denver first reported the story Monday, revealing there had been almost a dozen such instances of unlawful sexual contact. Here’s how it worked, police said.

The male TSA employee would alert a female colleague when he saw a good looking man approaching the checkpoint. The woman would then press a button on the body scanner to tell the machine that the man going through it was actually a woman, so the machine would indicate an oddity in the genital area.

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This gave the male screener an excuse to do a pat-down search on targeted passengers.

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The allegations came from an anonymous TSA employee last November who claimed the male screener had told her he “gropes” male passengers who come through the security checkpoint, according to a Denver Police report. Two months later, the agency sent a special agent to investigate.

On Feb. 9, the investigator saw the male screener give a signal when a passenger entered the scanner. The female screener pushed the button. “The scanner alerted to an anomaly,” the police report said, and he saw the male screener “conduct a patdown search of that passenger’s front groin and buttocks area with the palms of his hands, which is contradictory to TSA searching policy.”

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TSA’s pat-down policy states: “Security officers will use the back of their hand to pat-down a traveler’s sensitive areas. For non-sensitive areas, security officers will use the front of their hand.”

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When the investigator questioned the female employee, she admitted she had tricked the scanner at least 10 other times for her colleague and said she knew that by doing so, her colleague would be permitted to pat down the passengers, the report said.

Prosecutors initially declined to take the case because no victims had been identified, meaning there was no likelihood of a conviction, according to the police report. However, Denver District Attorney spokeswoman Lynn Kimbrough said Tuesday that prosecutors are looking at it again to see whether charges may be filed.

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“We were looking at it before through the narrow lens of a sex crime — now we’re broadening our perspective,” she told the Denver Post. “It’s possible that some other charge may be appropriate.”

Regarding the incident in February, TSA said it has video footage but could not identify the victim. The agency believes he was a Southwest Airlines passenger, but no one has not come forward to file charges, according to CBS Denver. The agency has refused to release the tape and any additional documents to the news station, citing an ongoing investigation.

“These alleged acts are egregious and intolerable,” TSA said in a statement. “TSA has removed the two officers from the agency. All allegations of misconduct are thoroughly investigated by the agency. And when substantiated, employees are held accountable.

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