Multiples are rare, but identical triplets are far more unusual. According to the father of three newborn triplets, they’re also “a miracle.”

Doctors at the Corpus Christi Medical Center told Sylvia Hernandez and her husband, Roel Torrez, that their identical triplet girls — two of whom are conjoined — were a 1-in-50 million occurrence.

Catalina Montserrat and conjoined sisters Ximena Jackeline and Scarlett Juliet were born by C-section on Saturday, just one day short of 34 weeks, the hospital said in a statement.

The conjoined girls were transferred to a different hospital, Driscoll Children’s, for continued medical care, which might eventually involve separating them.

AD

“Me and my wife decided: God gave these babies to us for a reason and it’s a miracle that he sent them to us,” Torrez told The Washington Post. “If they don’t get separated, we don’t care because that’s what God sent us and they are our little miracles.”

AD

All three girls were born weighing 4 pounds, 11 ounces and are breathing on their own, the Corpus Christi Medical Center said.

At first, Hernandez and Torrez were expecting a second child to join their 2 1/2-year-old son, also named Roel. A few months later, they were in for a series of surprises.

“First we found out that it was going to be two at around two months,” Torrez said. “Then at the third month when we found out we were having three, we were scared and anxious.”

A month after that, there was even more surprising news: Two of the babies would be conjoined.

AD

“We were afraid. The doctors were telling us they might have complications,” Torrez said. “We decided to go through with it. Doctors said everything was going to be okay.”

AD

On Monday morning, the family got good news: The girls have separate bladders, meaning doctors will not need to act to keep their bodily fluids separate to avoid infection.

Before her daughters’ birth, Hernandez was on bed rest in the hospital for five weeks. She is doing well and recovering after her C-section, her husband said.

Meanwhile, the family is raising money using a Go Fund Me page to help cover the cost of living and medical expenses.

AD

Torrez said he was forced to quit his job as a painter and sandblaster to take care of his wife in the later part of the pregnancy, when she was no longer able to walk or shower on her own.

At least two of the three girls probably will require months or years of care.

“We’re going to stay here,” Torrez said from Driscoll Children’s Hospital. “It’s risky to take them home. We want to keep them here until they get separated. We’re going to do our best to keep them here, keep them safe, and let the doctors do everything they need to with them.”

AD
AD