Protesters chant at the intersection of Franklin St. and Columbia St. where they formed a circle and stopped traffic for hours in Chapel Hill, N.C., Tuesday, March 29, 2016 to protest the recent passage of N.C. HB2. (Chris Seward/The News and Observer via AP)

For any North Carolinian turning to the Internet for carnal pleasure, one popular website will prove disappointing.

XHamster.com, a porn website that, as of Monday, is one of the world’s 100 most visited websites according to data from Alexa, is refusing to serve anyone using a computer in North Carolina. Since 12:30 p.m. Eastern time Monday, the website has appeared as a black screen for anyone with a North Carolina IP address.

Soon, it will display a petition to repeal North Carolina’s new law, passed on March 24, that requires transgender people to use the bathroom that correlates with the gender they were born with instead of the one they identify with. It also bars cities from passing their own laws to the contrary.

A transgender woman gathers likeminded North Carolinians in Charlotte to protest the state's controversial new law that restricts transgender people from using the bathroom that corresponds with their chosen gender. (Whitney Shefte/The Washington Post)

The bill was in response to a Charlotte, North Carolina, nondiscrimination ordinance which allowed transgendered people to use public bathrooms corresponding with the gender they identify with, The Post reported.

“We have spent the last 50 years fighting for equality for everyone and these laws are discriminatory which XHamster.com does not tolerate,” XHamster.com spokesman Mike Kulich told The Huffington Post.

Kulich finds the law hypocritical, based on XHamster.com’s popular search terms from the state.

“Judging by the stats of what you North Carolinians watch, we feel this punishment is a severe one,” Kulich said. “Back in March, we had 400,000 hits for the term ‘transsexual’ from North Carolina alone. People from that state searched ‘gay’ 319,907 times.”

“Hopefully, [the petition] will get as many signatures as the ‘transsexual’ searches,” he added.

The law hasn’t only cost North Carolinians access to pornography but also more mainstream entertainment.

In response to the law, Bruce Springsteen cancelled a show he was set to play last Sunday at Greensboro Coliseum. He took to Twitter and his website to explain why.

“Some things are more important than a rock show and this fight against prejudice and bigotry — which is happening as I write — is one of them,” Springsteen wrote. “It is the strongest means I have for raising my voice in opposition to those who continue to push us backwards instead of forwards.”

Bruce Springsteen has canceled a concert scheduled for this weekend in North Carolina to protest against a new state law restricting bathroom use by transgender individuals. (Reuters)

Some have even taken to Twitter to encourage other artists to avoid North Carolina.

But Kulich feels like blocking the state’s access to XHamster.com packs a bit more of a punch than a cancelled concert, even one by The Boss.

“I think that porn has the power to do what Bruce Springsteen can’t,” he said.

The law also caused North Carolina economic loss.

PayPal had announced plans for a $3.6 million expansion into the state by opening a global operations center in Charlotte, which the company said in a statement would have created more than 400 jobs for North Carolinians. The company has cancelled those plans.

“The new law perpetuates discrimination, and it violates the values and principles that are at the core of PayPal’s mission and culture,” PayPal president and CEO Dan Shulman said in the statement. “As a result, PayPal will not move forward with our planned expansion into Charlotte.”

North Carolina isn’t the only state being boycotted due to anti-LGBT laws. Mississippi has come under fire for a bill signed into law this past Tuesday that allows businesses to refuse service based on religious objections, The Post reported.

Mississippians may still have access to XHamster.com, but Canadian musician Bryan Adams cancelled a show scheduled for April 14 at Mississippi Coast Coliseum.

“I cannot in good conscience perform in a State where certain people are being denied their civil rights due to their sexual orientation,” Adams wrote in an Instagram post.

Finally, in reaction to these laws, a group of mayors formed a coalition calling themselves “Mayors Against Discrimination,” which include the mayors of New York City, San Francisco, Seattle and Philadelphia, among others, according to the Associated Press. Many have restricted the use of state funds for non-essential travel to both North Carolina and Mississippi.

“I believe strongly that we should add more protections to prevent discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender communities in the United States, not diminish them and deny people their constitutional rights,” said Seattle Mayor Edward B. Murray in a press release. “We as Mayors must stand up together and call out discrimination when we see it, and I believe working together we can create change to ensure the rights of all Americans.”

These sort of pressures have proven effective in the past.

On March 26, Indiana Gov. Mike Pence signed the “Religious Freedom Restoration Act,” which allows businesses to turn away LGBT people on the basis of religious objection, into law.

San Francisco Mayor Edwin Lee forbade city employees to travel to Indiana using public money, and NCAA president Mark Emmert said in a statement, “we intend to closely examine the implications of this bill and how it might affect future events as well as our workforce.

The bill was not repealed, but a measure stating that it could not be used to deny service to gay and lesbian customers was signed into law less than a week later, according to the Indy Star.

More recently, Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal announced he would veto House Bill 757, a bill with the same intent as Indiana’s amended law and Mississippi’s new one.

The announcement came after a wave of economic pressure to the state to not pass the bill.

Disney threatened to stop filming in Georgia and Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff, who also protested Indiana’s law, said his company would not “have a program in Georgia,” if it passed, according to CNN. Home Depot and Coca-Cola, both headquartered in Atlanta, also publicly denounced the bill. NFL spokesman Brian McCarthy said passage of the bill could result in Atlanta not being allowed to host a Super Bowl, ESPN reported.

Despite all this, North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory has continued to defend the new law, releasing the following video on March 29.

North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory released a video on March 29 dismissing criticism of a law banning transgender people from using bathrooms aligned with their gender identity. McCrory says some are demonizing the law "for political gain." (Office of Governor Pat McCrory)

It remains to be seen if these boycotts and bans will force the governor to switch his position. Until they do, though, it seems residents of the state will have to find pornography elsewhere.

“We will not stand by and pump revenue into a system that promotes this type of garbage,” Kulich said. “We respect all sexualities and embrace them.”