During a news conference at the White House on Oct. 16, President Trump claimed that "most" American presidents, including Barack Obama, didn't call families of soldiers who were killed in action. Former members of the Obama administration said this is false. (Reuters)

Anger sparked by President Trump’s false claims on Monday that Barack Obama and other past presidents did not reach out to families of fallen American troops swelled into the night.

Near midnight Monday, former U.S. attorney general Eric H. Holder Jr., who in 2009 accompanied Obama to Dover Air Force Base in Delaware to witness the return of 18 Americans killed in Afghanistan, tweeted for Trump to “stop the damn lying.” He added, “I went to Dover AFB with 44 and saw him comfort the families of both the fallen military & DEA.”

Retired Army Gen. Martin Dempsey, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff from 2011 to 2015, said in a tweet that Obama and President George W. Bush “and first ladies cared deeply, worked tirelessly for the serving, the fallen, and their families,” adding: “Not politics. Sacred Trust.”

Trump sparked the controversy with a casual comment in a disjointed news conference Monday in the Rose Garden.

When asked by a reporter why he had not spoken publicly about the four U.S. Special Forces members who were killed in an ambush in Niger nearly two weeks ago, Trump responded that he was going to send their families letters, which were drafted over the weekend, and he justified his behavior by referring to the practices of other presidents.

“If you look at President Obama and other presidents, most of them didn’t make calls. A lot of them didn’t make calls. I like to call when it’s appropriate, when I think I am able to do it,” he said. The Washington Post’s Fact Checker judged his description “false.”


President Barack Obama salutes as a team carries the remains of Army Sgt. Dale R. Griffin of Terre Haute, Ind., at Dover Air Force Base in October 2009. (Susan Walsh/AP)

Though he later seemed to take back the claim, saying that Obama “probably did” write letters “sometimes,” there was an immediate reaction that intensified through the night.

Ben Rhodes, who served as Obama’s deputy national security adviser, called the statement “an outrageous and disrespectful lie even by Trump standards.”

“Also: Obama never attacked a Gold Star family,” Rhodes added, likely referring to Trump’s lashing out at Khizr Khan, the father of a soldier killed in Iraq. Khan criticized Trump at the Democratic National Convention last year.

Several people tweeted a piece written by Dana Perino, who served as President George W. Bush’s press secretary, recalling a day when Bush visited wounded service members at the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, and “meekly accepted the rage of a grieving mother,” as David Frum, a former Bush speechwriter,  tweeted.

“When my brother was killed, Pres Bush listened while I screamed at him & then held me as I sobbed,” tweeted a user named Delilia O’Malley.

Enough other people tweeted stories, videos and photographs of former presidents comforting grieving families that the social media platform curated them into a Twitter Moment.

White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders later said Trump “wasn’t criticizing predecessors, but stating a fact. When American heroes make the ultimate sacrifice, presidents pay their respects. Sometimes they call, sometimes they send a letter, other times they have the opportunity to meet family members in person.”

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