The jobs are there, but finding certain skilled workers is getting tougher. (Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg News)

Given the amount of email promotions, pop-up ads and commercials that inundate our daily lives, would you believe that American companies are struggling to fill marketing positions?

It’s true, and, according to a new report from social media site LinkedIn, the problem is a growing challenge for business owners and managers looking for skilled people in a tight job market.

LinkedIn’s May Workforce Report — which uses data from the platform’s database of more than 146 million workers at more that 20,000 U.S. companies, as well as millions of job postings — identifies employment trends in the U.S. workforce to help determine issues affecting employers. This month, the report has highlighted a big gap in skills facing hiring managers: There’s a significant shortage of marketing specialists in the United States.

The analysis found a shortage of more than 230,000 people with marketing skills in the 20 largest metro areas that it covered. The areas with the biggest needs are the San Francisco Bay area, Boston, Seattle, the District and even the center of the advertising universe, New York City. Smaller cities — such as Nashville, Charlotte and Tucson — are also facing significant shortages.

So, what do you do if you’re looking for a skilled professional to help with social media, email campaigns and other marketing activities for your company? LinkedIn’s data suggests you may want to consider moving to Florida, to places such as Miami, Palm Beach, Daytona Beach or  Sarasota. Or to St. Louis, Las Vegas, Orange County, Calif., or Saginaw, Mich. Those are the places with an excess of marketing professionals.

It’s not just marketing skills that are in short supply. Some cities face even bigger challenges with other skill gaps — defined as the need for skilled employees by employers vs. the amount of people with those skills who live in the area. For example, companies in San Francisco, Washington and Austin are facing the biggest gaps in skills among their local labor force, particularly for jobs in technology, health care and education. But West Palm Beach, Fla.; Miami; Hartford, Conn.; and Philadelphia have an excess of skilled people.