President Trump answers a reporter’s question at the U.N. General Assembly on Sept. 25. (Evan Vucci/AP)
Opinion writer

No shock that Republicans’ tax plan didn’t pay for itself. “Government receipts held steady at $3.3 trillion, despite strong economic growth and a robust labor market. The low unemployment rate, which hit 3.7% in September, coupled with rising wages would typically drive government tax revenue higher.”

President Trump’s suggestion that “rogue killers” got to Jamal Khashoggi evidences shockingly bad faith. “Politics is not an endeavor in which good faith and objectivity flourish. But Trump’s double standards on evidence depending on his views of the accused are stark even in that context.”

Trump may be shocked that there’s no reasonable doubt about climate change. ” ‘There really is no serious scientific disagreement that if you put massive amounts of greenhouse gas in the atmosphere and you increase concentration, that traps heat,’ said Kate Marvel, an associate research scientist at the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies. ‘There really is no dispute on that.’ ”

Trump’s willful ignorance is less shocking than Republicans’ pretending he isn’t willfully ignorant. “The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change warned last week that the world would see even more dangerous conditions, including food shortages, by 2040. Could those conditions ‘go back,’ as Mr. Trump suggests? In the National Climate Assessment report on science approved by the White House in November, top federal scientists found unequivocally that they will not.”

Don’t be shocked if the administration doesn’t take action against the Saudis. “[Secretary of State Mike] Pompeo left Washington en route to Riyadh at midday Monday. ‘Determining what happened to Jamal Khashoggi is something of great importance to the president,’ State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert said. Mr. Trump also said King Salman had assured him that Saudi Arabia and Turkey were ‘working hand in hand, very closely on getting to the bottom of what happened.’ ”

No shocker that taking away protection for preexisting conditions is a political loser. “While Democratic enthusiasm this year has largely been fueled by anger toward President Donald Trump, candidates have targeted their messaging to focus more on health care. It’s the subject of the greatest share of political ads on television now, according to a Wall Street Journal analysis, and a top issue in campaigns from Virginia to Arkansas to California — and especially in Arizona, where Democratic Rep. Kyrsten Sinema has made it the foundation of her Senate campaign against [Martha] McSally.”

Allies will be shocked to hear that they are a greater threat to the United States than Iran or Russia. “American leaders have long clashed with allies. Yet Trump is unique in casting these allies not as occasionally problematic partners, but as direct threats to the United States—threats that, in many cases, are actually more dangerous than America’s customary enemies because they drain the country of its vitality while masquerading as a friend.”