After he briefly flirted with running for president in the 2012 cycle, Donald Trump waited until early 2013 to start speculating about running four years later. The way his 2016 campaign began was different from the effort he undertook in 2011, though; instead of simply announcing that he was thinking about running, he began retweeting people calling on him to run in 2016.

By our count, using data from the TrumpTwitterArchive, Trump retweeted 137 tweets from people that year suggesting he run for president in 2016. The sentiments expressed ranged from the obvious:

… to the weirdly topical:

…to the now-ironic:

Remember: At the time, this was the Trump who was best known for his role on “The Apprentice,” not for his political views. Analysis of Twitter data by the Laboratory for Social Machines at the MIT Media Lab shows that people who tweeted about “The Apprentice” each season were also more likely to follow Trump and not Hillary Clinton (or Bernie Sanders or Ted Cruz) than to follow Clinton (or Sanders or Cruz) to the exclusion of the other candidates.

That gap was particularly wide in 2015, when Trump announced his candidacy — but those who watched the show in its 2013 season were also much more likely last year to follow only Trump. More than 8 percent of those who tweeted about the show during that season followed Trump but none of the other three last year.

Many of the accounts that first earned retweets from Trump for their encouragement to run are no longer active. Through May of 2013, there were 38 such retweets; the accounts that sent 16 of them are now dead, coming up as nonexistent.

Overall, about half of the accounts that Trump retweeted that year were somehow inaccessible or had been dormant through the 2016 election. (That number includes three users whose accounts were suspended and two that are now pumping out spam.)

Of the slightly-more-than-half that have visible tweets, the majority still support Trump. A quarter of that smaller group didn’t express an opinion about the presidency of the man they once begged to run. Thirteen percent of them clearly now oppose Trump’s presidency.

Some examples:

Supporters

2013

2016

2013

2017

2013

2016

In at least one case, that retweet from Trump appears to have solidified a person’s eventual support.

2013

2016

Opponents

2013

2017

2013

2017

Mixed feelings

2013

2017

2013

2017

Some of them were pretty clearly being facetious (though Trump may not have picked up on it). Mother Jones’ Ben Dreyfuss tweeted his fake support; Trump ran with it. Another person trolled Trump with the Internet-famous cash-hope-jobs joke, which Trump doesn’t appear to have caught.

Others had other, related requests. It’s not clear if Trump upheld his promise to D.J. BlueArrow — though BlueArrow did oppose his candidacy.

There are a few lessons to be learned from this. The first is that Twitter sees a lot of churn in its usernames. If someone abandons a username, someone else can grab it, which means that, even among those who expressed support for or opposition to Trump recently, it may not be the same person. The second is that there’s a big difference between calling for a celebrity to run for president and actually hoping that celebrity goes through with it.

The third is to watch your alcohol intake.