As demonstrations against high-profile police-involved deaths stretched into a fourth day in multiple cities, the mother of one of the victims, Eric Garner, encouraged protesters to “keep on doing it, but do it in peace.”

Gwen Carr, whose son died in July after an encounter with a New York City police officer, said Saturday that her family has been heartened by the protests following a Staten Island grand jury’s decision Wednesday not to indict the officer.

“It is just so awesome to see how the crowds were out there,” Carr said, according to USA Today. “They are out there. They are standing for my son. My heart is overflowing with joy. It’s just a gracious feeling.”

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“I just want to thank each and every person that’s out there marching,” said Garner’s widow, Esaw, according to USA Today.

The family’s remarks were made at the Harlem headquarters of Rev. Al Sharpton’s National Action Network on Saturday afternoon as protests continued across the country.

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The daytime demonstrations followed another busy night, as demonstrators spilled into the streets in cities across the country to protest police officers killing black men.

In New York, where a grand jury declined to bring charges against officer Daniel Pantaleo in the death of Garner on Wednesday and three nights of protesting ensued, police geared up for another night of demonstrations following the funeral today of an unarmed black man killed last month by a New York City police officer.

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Akai Gurley, 28, was shot and killed by Peter Liang in a the stairwell of a Brooklyn apartment, according to Reuters. On Friday, the article noted, the Brooklyn district attorney said “a grand jury would consider charges” against Liang. Gurley’s funeral took place in a Baptist church in Brooklyn and was attended by a group of friends and family that included his 2-year-old daughter, according to CBS New York.

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“Today we’re here because of how Akai was killed, and it’s called racial profiling,” Kevin Powell, a community activist, said in the eulogy, according to CBS. “This is an embarrassment to the United States of America that one young person after another of color is being killed, you know, there’s no justice out there. This is an embarrassment.”

New York protests kicked off with a “die in” involving several hundred protesters Friday night in an Apple store on Fifth Avenue and in Macy’s at Herald Square, according to the Associated Press. Several hours later, protesters blocked FDR Drive, a heavily-trafficked thoroughfare that traces the eastern edge of Manhattan, according to Reuters.

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At each location, protesters carried signs and filled the streets with chants of “Black lives matter” and “I can’t breathe.”

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Though the protests in New York were largely peaceful, authorities said, there were 20 arrests between 9 p.m. and midnight, according to Newsday. That number was a sharp decrease from a night earlier, when more than 200 protesters were arrested after they brought traffic on the Brooklyn and Manhattan bridges to a standstill, according to the New York Daily News.

“This is the largest store in America, and it’s the perfect place to drive home the message: Black lives matter,” Harris Agbor, a 25-year-old Harlem resident protesting in the Apple store, told the paper. “Everyone is energized. It’s electric.”

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Similar protests took place in cities around the country, including Denver, Miami, Chicago, New Orleans, Austin and Washington.

Among the most vigorous demonstrations were those that unfolded in Oakland on Friday night, where a crowd of protesters blocked Interstate 880. Demonstrators also shut down a BART  station, staged a “die-in” that shut down surface transit and “roughed up a store owner,” according to the San Francisco Chronicle.

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“I was just trying to protect my business and they tried to beat the sh— out of me,” Edwin Cabrillo, a downtown worker who tried to stop protesters from smashing several storefront windows, told the paper. “We put all our money, all our lives into these businesses. I understand what you are protesting — what happened to those people was wrong — but what’s happening to us, that’s f— up. … And you wonder why Oakland doesn’t prosper.”

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Protests have escalated in the days following a Staten Island grand jury’s decision on Wednesday not to indict Pantaleo in Garner’s death. That decision came after a grand jury declined to indict Ferguson, Mo., police officer Darren Wilson in the shooting death of Michael Brown, an unarmed black teenager. Both decisions sparked calls of injustice and stirred emotions over other officer-involved deaths around the country.

In Florida, demonstrators blocked a bridge connecting Miami to Miami Beach, and in the Denver suburb of Aurora, middle school students staged a walk-out, according to the AP.

“It makes us kids feel unsafe, that we’re outsiders, enemies of society,” Bennie Mahonda, an eighth-grader who is black, told the AP.

[This post has been updated multiple times.]

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