This undated photo provided by the family’s attorney shows Tamir Rice. Rice, 12, was fatally shot by police in Cleveland after brandishing what turned out to be a replica gun, triggering an investigation into his death and a legislator’s call for such weapons to be brightly colored or bear special markings. (Courtesy of Richardson & Kucharski Co., L.P.A. via AP)

Six months after the 12-year-old was shot and killed by Cleveland police, the family of Tamir Rice has had his body cremated.

The body of Tamir, who was shot and killed Nov. 22 while playing with a toy gun in a park, has been kept in storage by his family, who said that they did not want to bury him until the official investigation into the shooting was complete.

But as the probe continues to stretch on, and following a burst of fundraising for the family after The Post and other outlets noted the family’s financial troubles, the family decided to have Rice cremated — which was first reported by the Daily Kos.

“Tamir has been cremated,” said Walter Madison, the Ohio-based attorney working with Rice’s family, who said that the decision was made late last week. “His mother made the grief-stricken decision to have her son cremated.”

The Rice family had been paying to preserve his body, arguing that they did not want Tamir put to final rest until the legal probe of the shooting was complete in case there was a need to conduct an additional medical examination.

“What everyone needs to understand is that Samaria Rice is a mother first,” he said. “Whether in life or death, her instinct is to take care of her child. Him not being put to final rest was just physically, emotionally, psychologically unsettling to her.”

Tamir was shot Nov. 22 after a resident exiting a community center near the park where the boy was playing phoned police to report a young man with what appeared to be a gun.

Several people close to the police department have said that the officers, unaware that the caller indicated that Tamir was likely playing with a toy, expected the boy to run. When he did not flee, but rather took a step toward the officers after they pulled their cruiser up next to him, one of the two officers shot him in the chest.

The investigation into the shooting of Rice remains ongoing, even as the city continues to brace for potential protests or unrest if the officers are not charged with a crime in the shooting.

Sheriff Clifford Pinkney gave an update in the investigation of 12-year-old Tamir Rice's death, saying more interviews need to be conducted, but "the majority of our work is complete." (Reuters)

On Tuesday, the Cuyahoga County sheriff’s department, which is investigating the shooting, said that the bulk of the investigation has been completed. Officials close to the investigation say they expect it to be concluded in the coming weeks.

The sheriff’s department will deliver its report to the county prosecutor’s office, which will then decide whether or not the officers involved in the shooting should be charged or opt to bring the case to a grand jury.

Attorneys and Rice family members themselves have expressed frustration with what they view as an investigation that has taken too long.

“My family is very disappointed with how this investigation has transpired,” Latonya Goldsby, a cousin of Rice’s, told reporters following the sheriff’s news conference. “I feel so disgusted with the city of Cleveland for not showing some type of compassion to my family. We had to bury a 12-year-old kid.”