Texas Agricultural Commissioner Sid Miller. (Eric Gay/AP)

Sid Miller is mad as hell, and he’s not going to take it anymore.

The outspoken Texas agriculture commissioner is fed up with political correctness this holiday Christmas season, he said in a widely shared Facebook post.

If one more person says Happy Holidays to me I just might slap them. Either tell me Merry Christmas or just don’t say anything.

Posted by Sid Miller on Wednesday, December 16, 2015

The post from Miller, a Republican, generated quite a response, with thousands of likes and shares on Facebook. Many of the most-liked responses have criticized Miller for encouraging violence and ignoring other holidays at this time of year.

[The ‘Defend Christmas Freedom Hotline’ is now open. Operators are standing by.]

Even the state’s Democratic party weighed in, though it alleged on Twitter that its response was deleted on Miller’s Facebook page:

Miller has a long and storied history of stirring controversy.

Last month, he posted a photo of refugees alongside another of rattlesnakes and a message: “Can you tell me which of these rattlers won’t bite you? Sure some of them won’t, but tell me which ones so we can bring them into the house.”

Can you tell me which of these rattlers won’t bite you? Sure some of them won’t, but tell me which ones so we can bring them into the house.

Posted by Sid Miller on Wednesday, November 18, 2015

A spokesman later defended the post to local press.

“I think the post speaks for itself — that you don’t know which of the Syrian refugees may be ISIS terrorists posing as refugees,” Todd Smith, Miller’s campaign spokesman, told the Austin American-Statesman.

[The ‘War on Christmas’ erupts in Italy]

Over the summer, Miller shared an image that had been posted elsewhere on Facebook, featuring what appeared to be a nuclear bomb explosion behind the following text: “Japan has been at peace with the U.S. since August 9, 1945. It’s time we made peace with the Muslim world.”

Miller later removed his reposting of the image.

“It was an error by a staffer. The posting did not reflect the views of Commissioner Miller and as a result it’s been removed,” Miller’s special assistant Luke Bullock told the Houston Chronicle at the time. He also added that Miller “will ensure that future postings do not reflect views that do not align with his view.”