The Miami Police Department has agreed to provide enhanced training and supervision of officers and to have state authorities investigate the city’s officer-involved shootings as part of a broad settlement agreement with the Department of Justice, federal authorities announced Thursday.

The agreement, which will be overseen by former Tampa Police Chief Jane Castor, resolves a Justice Department probe of officer-involved shootings that found Miami officers engaged in a “pattern or practice of excessive use of force” in firing weapons at suspects. According to the Miami Herald, the Justice Department reviewed 33 police shootings as part of a civil rights investigation of city police practices from 2008 to 2011 and found three were unjustified and untold others “may have resulted from tactical and training deficiencies.”

As part of the settlement, Miami police agreed to transfer authority over criminal investigations of officer-involved shootings to the Florida Department of Law enforcement, rather than have city homicide detectives work the cases, and to provide a more stringent mechanism under which officers involved in shootings will be allowed to return to work, federal authorities said. Miami police also agreed to downsize their Tactical Operations Section, to give officers de-escalation training and to create a review board to look into problematic incidents, federal authorities said.

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“The agreement will help to strengthen the relationship between the MPD and the communities they serve by improving accountability for officers who fire their weapons unlawfully, and provides for community participation in the enforcement of this agreement,” Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General Vanita Gupta, who heads the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division, said in a statement.

The Justice Department said the agreement was approved by Miami’s city commission Thursday and would take effect once all those involved had signed.

Officials in Ferguson, Mo., had agreed to similar training and other measures earlier this year, though that agreement ultimately collapsed, and the Justice Department is now pursuing a lawsuit.

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