The Alabama Supreme Court ruled Friday that the state’s death-penalty system is still constitutional, determining that it is unaffected by a U.S. Supreme Court ruling striking down Florida’s capital punishment process.

This ruling came in the case of Jerry Bohannon, who was convicted of killing two men near a Mobile, Ala., nightclub and sentenced to death.

Bohannon had argued that his death sentence should be vacated because of the U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling in January that Florida’s system of imposing death sentences is unconstitutional because it allowed judges, rather than juries, to make that call.

While the systems are not exactly the same, a judge in Alabama had ruled earlier this year against Alabama’s death-sentencing structure because judges can override jury recommendations there. Bohannon argued that because a judge can determine an aggravating factor worthy of a death sentence apart from the jury, “the resulting death sentence is unconstitutional.”

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In its ruling Friday, the Alabama Supreme Court disagreed and said it concluded “that Alabama’s capital-sentencing scheme is consistent with the Sixth Amendment.”

This is the second big news to emerge Friday involving the Alabama Supreme Court. Earlier in the day, Roy S. Moore, the court’s chief justice, was suspended from the bench and pulled from office by a judiciary court for his defiance over same-sex marriage.

Associate Justice Lyn Stuart wrote the opinion upholding Alabama’s death-penalty system, and six of the seven remaining justices concurred. The eighth concurred in the result.

The U.S. Supreme Court ruling in Florida occurred in Hurst v. Florida. After the justices struck down that death-penalty system, the state revamped its death penalty, but that still left things unsettled in Florida. Florida has not carried out an execution since the Hurst ruling, and the state’s Supreme Court is considering whether to overturn death sentences for some or all of the state’s nearly 400 death-row inmates.

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Alabama Attorney General Luther Strange, who has previously insisted that the state’s death-penalty system remained intact and unaffected by the Florida ruling, praised the decision.

“Today’s ruling is an important victory for victims and for criminal justice,” Strange said in a statement. “The Hurst ruling has no bearing whatsoever on the constitutionality of Alabama’s death penalty, which has been upheld numerous times.”

Christopher E. Brooks, an Alabama inmate, sought to stop his lethal injection earlier this year by arguing that the system he was sentenced under is “virtually identical” to the Florida system. The U.S. Supreme Court rejected his appeal, and he was executed by lethal injection in January.

Alabama is one of just five states to carry out an execution this year, along with Texas, Florida, Missouri and Georgia. It has two executions scheduled for later this year.

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