Bernice King speaks during the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. holiday commemorative service at Ebenezer Baptist Church. (Branden Camp/AP Photo)

The daughter of civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. has shared on social media a list of tips, apparently aimed at those who look to push back against President Trump’s administration.

Bernice King on Tuesday posted to Facebook “some wise advice circulating,” which was essentially a series of tips for demonstrators or others wanting to voice opposition. It was not immediately clear where the tips originated, though King did not appear to be the original author, as similar Facebook posts had earlier time stamps.

The post cautioned against spreading “fake news” and urged a positive message. Referring to Trump, it mentioned using “his name sparingly” and remembering that “he’s not acting alone.”

“Focus on his policies, not his appearance and mental state,” read one tip.

Read another:”Resist!”

The Facebook post does not mention Trump by name or suggest what prompted King to post it. It does indicate that it has been “amended.” According to a screenshot that circulated on Twitter, one change appears to have been altering a line: “Don’t use his name; EVER (45 will do).”

Bernice King did not immediately return an email seeking comment Wednesday.

“When you post or talk about him, don’t assign his actions to him, assign them to ‘The Republican Administration,’ or ‘The Republicans,'” the post stated. “This will have several effects: the Republican legislators will either have to take responsibility for their association with him or stand up for what some of them don’t like; he will not get the focus of attention he craves; Republican representatives will become very concerned about their re-elections.”

You can read the full Facebook message here. You can also find it at the end of this post, where it is embedded.

The day after Republicans rebuked Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) for quoting the late Coretta Scott King on attorney general nominee Jeff Sessions, White House press secretary Sean Spicer says he hopes that if King were still alive, she would "see his record and his commitment to voting and civil rights." (Reuters)

Based on the time stamp of a corresponding tweet and the time indicated on C-SPAN footage, King’s Facebook post appears to have come before Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) was silenced during a speech that opposed attorney general nominee Jeff Sessions on Wednesday night. In the speech, Warren read a letter about Sessions from Martha Luther King Jr.’s widow, Coretta Scott King, which was written in 1986. Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated in 1968. Coretta Scott King died in 2006.

On Twitter, Bernice King spoke out in support of Warren’s effort, writing: “Thank you @SenWarren for being the soul of the Senate during the #Sessions hearing.”

During a speech in January, Bernice King reportedly told a crowd at a university in New York state to branch out and speak with others who might hold different views. A WGRZ-TV report on her speech at Niagara University noted that one of Bernice King’s cousins was a Trump voter, a decision that the two had discussed.

The station reported that she challenged the crowd to ask questions, and dig deeper.

“Yes, we have to let our voices be heard,” she said in the speech, video of which was posted to WGRZ’s site. “But we have to be wise and shrewd in this hour.”

Bernice King’s brother, Martin Luther King III, who is the eldest son of Martin Luther King Jr. and Coretta Scott King, met with Trump in January, in advance of the inauguration.

President-elect Donald Trump on Jan. 16 met with the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s eldest son, Martin Luther King III, at Trump Tower. King III said Trump told him that he intends to "represent" all citizens as president. (The Washington Post)

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