The Washington Post
Politics ⋅ Live Blog

Super Tuesday live blog: Trump, Clinton are big winners

March 9, 2016

Even though he lost Texas, Donald Trump was the clear winner for the Republican Party on Tuesday, ending the day as the unrivaled favorite for the nomination. On the Democratic side, Hillary Clinton strengthened her momentum, helped in part by a sweep of Southern states with large black voting populations.

  • Washington Post Staff
  • ·

Billionaire Donald Trump is projected to win the Republican presidential primary in Vermont, ending the campaign season’s most momentous day of balloting as the unrivaled favorite for the Republican presidential nomination.

  • Kayla Epstein
  • ·

We need to talk about Chris Christie. Specifically, his expression of resignation and horror as he stood behind Donald Trump tonight in Florida.

As Janell Ross writes:

The Fix — and it seems much of Twitter — could not help but notice that Chris Christie showed up in Florida at Donald Trump’s faux Versailles — er, we mean Mar-a-Lago — and had some difficulties…Once Trump took the stage, Twitter stepped in to annotate the, um, various things that Christie was doing with his face.

https://twitter.com/jimtankersley/status/704862622781349888

There is so, so, so much more where that came from. Check out Janell’s full post at The Fix for more of the meme.

  • Washington Post Staff
  • ·

Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont is projected to win the Democratic caucuses in Minnesota, according to the Associated Press.

  • Washington Post Staff
  • ·

Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida has been projected as the winner in Minnesota, his first victory of the 2016 primary season, according to the Associated Press.

  • Washington Post Staff
  • ·

Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont is projected to win the Democratic caucuses in Colorado, according to the Associated Press.

  • Washington Post Staff
  • ·

Super Tuesday turnout estimates from Edison Media Research:

turnout2

(This post has been updated)

  • Gillian Brockell
  • ·


Former presidential candidate Gov. Jeb Bush posted a video to Snapchat showing him relaxing over dinner and watching a “Funny or Die” video.

  • Scott Clement
  • ·

ESSEX JUNCTION, VT – MARCH 1: Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders, flanked by family, waves to his supporters before addressing them during a Super Tuesday rally at the Champlain Valley Exposition on March 1, 2016 in Essex Junction, VT. (Photo by Ricky Carioti/ The Washington Post)

Some takeaways from Bernie Sanders’s victory in Oklahoma:

  • The Sanders win may be seen as much a rejection of Hillary Clinton and of Barack Obama’s presidency as an endorsement of Sanders himself. Only 38 percent of Oklahoma Democrats said the next president should “continue Obama’s policies” in preliminary exit polls reported by CNN, the lowest of any state before Super Tuesday. That result comes from a group Clinton has dominated (she won 66 percent of their votes in Oklahoma). About 3 in 10 said the next president should pursue more liberal policies than Obama and another 3 in 10 sought a less liberal agenda; Sanders led Clinton by more than 2 to 1 among both groups.
  • Oklahomans expressed wide doubts about Clinton’s honesty: 46 percent said she is honest and trustworthy while 52 percent said she is not. Fully 66 percent of Oklahoma Democrats saw Sanders as honest and trustworthy.
  • Young people came through for Sanders: He didn’t just win among young voters, he trounced Clinton by over 60 points among those under 30 and by 42 points among those 30 to 44 years old, according to preliminary exit polls reported by CNN. Meanwhile, Clinton was only able to eke past Sanders among voters 45 and older, pulling in about half of those votes. Compare that with Texas, right next door, where Sanders won voters under 30 by a smaller 34-point margin and led Clinton by a narrower 9-point margin with those in their 30s and early 40s.
  • Conservatives for Bernie? A majority of Democratic primary voters in Oklahoma said their political views are moderate or conservative, a sharp break from early contests where sometimes record levels identified as liberals. This would figure to be trouble for a self-identified Democratic socialist — but Sanders won conservative Democrats by a 2 to 1 margin over Clinton preliminary exit poll data reported by CNN (51 to 22 percent). Sanders also won by modest margins among liberal voters, while narrowly trailing Clinton among moderates. In neighboring Texas, liberals made up a clear majority of the electorate (60 percent) and Clinton led Sanders among all ideological groups. Her biggest margin came among moderates, where she led Sanders by over 2 to 1.
  • Sanders won roughly two-thirds of the vote both for people who think the most important quality in a candidate is that he or she cares about them and is honest according to preliminary exit poll data reported by CNN. In Texas, Sanders won the “honest” vote as well, but by a smaller margin, and Clinton won among voters who say they want a candidate who cares about them.
  • Kayla Epstein
  • ·

Also:

  • Arelis R. Hernández
  • ·

BALTIMORE–Ben Carson did not, by any measure, have a good night.

He appears to have finished fourth or fifth in the 11 states that voted on Super Tuesday. But Carson and his supporters weren’t deterred by the disappointing returns as they gathered in the Corinthian room of Baltimore’s Grand hotel, mentioning that he’s not quite ready to “quit untangling” the “rotten” political system.

“It’s good to be back in Baltimore again,” he said, thanking all those who have worked to keep his campaign going. He said he hears from Americans all the time, imploring him to stay in the race: “You cannot leave us,” Carson recalled them saying.

The event opened with a word of prayer. “It’s by faith that we go forward in the campaign,” a man at the microphone said.

The mostly serene room — which included Rep. Andy Harris (R-Md.), who has endorsed Carson after they worked together at John’s Hopkins — erupted with cheers as Carson took the stage. They lifted signs with words like “revive,” “heal,” and “inspire.”

Carson denounced the political powers and special interests he said have contaminated government. He echoed parts of his Fox News op-ed, saying he is resisting pressure from others to drop out.

“It is rotten, it is rotten to the core,” Carson said of the country’s political system. But “I’m not ready to quit untangling it quite yet.”

“Maybe we will have an imperfect candidate, in fact, we will… Even if it’s me,” Carson said encouraging Republicans to vote even if he is not the Republican nominee. “That’s alright, as long as we can help that candidate as long as we can work with that candidate … We can somehow get through this.”

  • Philip Bump
  • ·

Donald Trump is the preferred presidential candidate of moderate Republicans in New Hampshire and Massachusetts, as well as very conservative ones in Georgia and Alabama. He’s racked up enough support across the board and leveraged a splintered field to win — as of writing — every state except Iowa.

Going back to 1960, well before all of the states regularly weighed in on the nomination, no Republican nominee has won the states of Alabama, Georgia, Massachusetts, Tennessee, New Hampshire, Nevada, Virginia and South Carolina. Much of that is because of the long-standing split between Northeastern Republicans and Southern ones. You can see that in the maps below; almost always when a nominee lost only one or two of these states, he often lost it in New England.

Collection

There’s nothing necessarily significant about these eight states, beyond that they’re the ones Trump won. Trump, too, has a loss, just like the 1980 nominee, Ronald Reagan. The reason it’s worth noting, though, is simple:

All of these people ended up being the nominee.

  • Washington Post Staff
  • ·

So far tonight, John Kasich has won 13 delegates to Donald Trump’s 139 — fewer than any candidate except Ben Carson. He says he’s okay with that.

  • Ed O'Keefe
  • ·

MIAMI — Florida Sen. Marco Rubio appears to be on the verge of losing every Super Tuesday contest, but no matter. He asked thousands of supporters at an equestrian center here to focus on two weeks from now.

“Two weeks from tonight, right here in Florida, we are going to send a message loud and clear. We are going to send a message that the party of Lincoln and Reagan and the presidency of the United States will never be held by a con artist,” he told thousands of cheering fans.

The Florida senator took the stage at the Ronald Reagan Equestrian Center just as news outlets declared that Texas Sen. Ted Cruz had won the Oklahoma Republican primary. And minutes after Donald Trump had sealed up a victory in Virginia — one place where the Rubio team thought they might sneak ahead.

Rubio reminded the crowd that in the past five days, “we began to unmask the true nature of the front-runner so far in this race. Five days ago we began to explain to the American people that Donald Trump is a con artist. … We are seeing in state after state — he loves to talk about polls — we are seeing in state after state, his numbers are going down and ours are going up.”

But some in the crowd wondered whether Rubio had waited too long to go after Trump.

“It’s good to see him doing it, but I don’t know if it’s too late,” said Robert Matos, who lives in Miami. “He waited too long to attack Trump directly. He just waited too long. It makes you think, all of them waited so long when they could have gone after him.”

Rubio quickly departed the venue after briefly working a rope line. He was off to explain his horrible, no good, very bad night to television anchors leading national coverage of the Super Tuesday results.

  • Kayla Epstein
  • ·

The Donald seems pleased.

  • Kayla Epstein
  • ·

Our reporter Abby Phillip came across this dynamic duo at Hillary Clinton’s Miami party.

Look at these two, setting aside their differences and attending together! The only political party they care about is the hoppin’ one they just crashed together. They’re so in sync with each other, even their wigs are coordinated.

Their friendship should set an example for all in this divided country! Gosh darn it, we don’t care what the pessimists say: there may yet be hope for our democra–

MIAMI, FL – Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton impersonators at Super Tuesday watch party for former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton in Miami, Florida on Tuesday March, 1, 2016. (Photo by Melina Mara/The Washington Post)

Oh. Ok then.

The real Hillary Clinton did not attack Trump quite as directly as her doppelganger, but she did take swipes at him in her speech tonight:

  • Gillian Brockell
  • ·

Video posted to social media shows Donald Trump supporters and protesters shoving and yelling at a rally in Louisville, Ky., on Mar. 1. Outside the rally, more protesters shouted, “No racism, no KKK, no fascist U.S.A.”

  • Anne Gearan
  • ·

We may have seen the start of Hillary Clinton’s general election campaign on Tuesday night.

The former first lady sounded themes she’s likely to revisit in the coming months after clinching sweeping wins in Texas and across the South on Super Tuesday. Especially if Donald Trump, who appeared to be having an equally good night, ultimately emerges with the Republican nod.

Clinton didn’t name check The Donald in her victory speech in Miami. But she decried the tenor of the Republican contest and laid out the issues, including income inequality, that she intends to run on.

“This country belongs to all of us, not just those at the top, not just to people who look one way, worship one way or even think one way,” she said.

Clinton also played off Trump’s slogan that he will “Make America Great Again.”

“America prospers when we all prosper. America is strong when we’re all strong,” she said. “And we know we’ve got work to do, but that work is not to make America great again. America never stopped being great.”

“We have to make America whole — we have to fill in, fill in what’s been hollowed out. We have to make strong the broken places, restitch the bonds of trust and respect across our country.”

  • Rebecca Sinderbrand
  • ·

Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont has won the Democratic primary in Oklahoma over former secretary of state Hillary Clinton, according to the Associated Press.

  • Scott Clement
  • ·

A 55 percent majority of Virginia Republican voters said they would be dissatisfied with Donald Trump becoming the party’s standard bearer — but they couldn’t rally behind any of his challengers to block his victory. By contrast, 59 percent of Republicans said they would be satisfied with Marco Rubio becoming the nominee, while 42 percent would be satisfied with Ted Cruz.

But Trump’s detractors were splintered — 50 percent of those who were dissatisfied with Trump supported Rubio in preliminary exit poll data, but 22 percent backed Cruz and another 17 percent supported John Kasich. Looked at another way, among those who would be happy with Rubio, he won just about half. Trump locked down voters who said they would be satisfied with him leading the GOP ticket, with fully 76 percent of this group voting for him in Virginia.

  • Washington Post Staff
  • ·

The Texas senator beat businessman Donald Trump, who held a clear lead in polling going into the vote.

Load More
No More Posts
Most Read
Share your reactions to the speakers: