The Washington Post

Inaugural lunch menu: Lobster, bison, apple pie

The Joint Congressional Committee on Inaugural Ceremonies on Wednesday released the menu for the inaugural luncheon at the Capitol following President Obama's swearing-in ceremony.

The president, vice president, cabinet members, Supreme Court justices and Congressional leadership will be among the guests at the traditional luncheon in Statuary Hall. 

“This Inaugural luncheon menu incorporates foods that the first Americans enjoyed, but with a modern, forward looking approach," said Sen. Charles Schumer (D-N.Y.), the chairman of the JCCIC. "I’m confident that Democrats, Republicans and representatives from all three branches alike will enjoy these incredible dishes from all corners of our nation.”

Here's the menu:

First Course: Steamed Lobster with New England Chowder; Anthony Road Winery, Fox Run Vineyards & Newt Red Cellars, Tierce 2010 Dry Riesling, Finger Lakes, N.Y.

Second Course: Hickory Grilled Bison with Wild Huckleberry Reduction and Red Potato Horseradish Cake; Bedell Cellars, 2009 Merlot, North Fork, Long Island

Third Course: Hudson Valley Apple Pie, Sour Cream Ice Cream, Aged Cheese and Honey; Korbel Natural, Special Inaugural Cuvée Champagne, Calif.

Like the wines, the entertainment, Rochester University's Eastern String Quartet, comes from Schumer's home state of New York.

Despite Schumer's hopes that his menu will bring harmony to the Capitol, the menu planning was not without controversy. He irked Washington city officials and environmentalists in August by urging planners to serve water bottled in Saratoga Springs, N.Y. at the luncheon. He responded to the D.C. Water and Sewer authority, assuring them that their tap water would also be available for guests.

See more inauguration coverage.

Natalie Jennings is a senior producer for Washington Post Video.

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