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Obama and Mark Kirk share exploding fist bump

On his way to the podium Tuesday night, President Obama chatted with Sen. Mark Kirk, an Illinois Republican who just returned to office after a year spent recovering from a stroke. Then this happened:

Obama is known for his fist bumps, but the exploding fist bump adds a new level. The moment was not shown live on networks Tuesday night but was picked up by reporters from pool camera feeds. Kirk's office also retweeted a GIF of the moment:

After the fist bump, politicians then shared a more conventional hug. Who says bipartisanship is dead?

The 53-year old Kirk, who describes himself as a "fiscal conservative, social moderate, and national security hawk" holds Obama's old seat in the Senate.

Rachel Weiner covers local politics for The Washington Post.

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