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Georgia GOP chair: Straight people could abuse gay marriage for benefits

Sue Everhart, the chairwoman of the Georgia Republican Party, said in a story posted over the weekend that straight people might abuse gay marriage laws in order to get marital benefits.

“You may be as straight as an arrow, and you may have a friend that is as straight as an arrow,” Everhart told the Marietta Daily Journal. “Say you had a great job with the government where you had this wonderful health plan. I mean, what would prohibit you from saying that you’re gay, and y’all get married and still live as separate, but you get all the benefits? I just see so much abuse in this it’s unreal."

Everhart added: "There is no way that this is about equality. To me, it’s all about a free ride.”

Everhart stressed that she doesn't think gay people should be ostracized. But she also said it's "not natural" for them to marry and suggested that gay marriage would lead children to believe that homosexuality is natural and discourage them from engaging in heterosexual relationships.

“You’re creating with this child that it’s a lifestyle, don’t go out and marry someone else of a different sex because this is natural,” Everhart said. “But if I had a next door neighbor who was in a gay relationship, I could be just as friendly to them as I could be to you and your wife or anybody else. I’m not saying that we ostracize them or anything like that. I’m just saying I’m against marriage because once you get the gay marriage you get everything else.”

Everhart's theory that straight people could use gay marriage to gain benefits was the subject of a 2007 Adam Sandler comedy called "I Now Pronounce You Chuck and Larry."

Aaron Blake covers national politics and writes regularly for The Fix.

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