HARDISTY, ALBERTA - JUNE 21: Bryan Templeton is facilities manager at the Keystone facility. The pipes at left are literally the ones that will connect the existing Keystone operation with the new expanded Keystone XL (AKA Keystone B) which is under construction.(Photo by Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post HARDISTY, ALBERTA - JUNE 21: Bryan Templeton is facilities manager at the Keystone facility. The pipes at left will connect the existing Keystone operation with the new expanded Keystone XL (AKA Keystone B) which is under construction. (Photo by Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post

Just a day before President Obama announced he would only approve the Keystone XL pipeline if it "does not significantly exacerbate the climate problem," six environmental groups quietly lodged a protest with the State Department charging it would do exactly that.

The 48-page letter obtained by The Washington Post demands the State Department, which has jurisdiction over the pipeline permit, prepare a new supplemental environmental impact statement to take into account several new analyses that they say prove the project will speed heavy crude extraction in Canada's oil sands region.