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N.C. GOP precinct chairman resigns after using racial slurs on ‘Daily Show’

 

A local Republican precinct chairman in North Carolina has resigned after using a racial slur during an interview with "The Daily Show," according to WRAL-TV.

Buncombe County GOP precinct chairman Don Yelton used the N-word and referred to "lazy blacks" while discussing the state's new Voter ID law with the show.

In response, the local GOP asked for Yelton's resignation, according to the TV station's report:

Buncombe GOP Chairman Henry Mitchell said Don Yelton officially stepped down from his position Thursday.

In a segment that aired Wednesday night, Yelton blasted "lazy black people that wants the government to give them everything," one of a slew of racially inflammatory comments he made in the interview.

Mitchell called the remarks "offensive, uniformed and unacceptable of any member within the Republican Party."

"Let me make it very clear, Mr. Yelton's comments do not reflect the belief or feelings of Buncombe Republicans, nor do they mirror any core principle that our party is founded upon," Mitchell said in a press release. "This mentality will not be supported or propagated within our party."

According to the release, this isn't the first time Yelton has clashed with local party leadership.

"Yelton was recently reprimanded and removed from his position as a precinct chair in Buncombe County for a period of time in 2012 through 2013 and was then re-elected to precinct chair by two votes (his wife and himself) at the 2013 convention, placing him back on the Buncombe County Executive Committee," said the statement, which also noted that Yelton neither sought nor got approval to speak on behalf of the GOP.

The state party leadership also issued a statement calling for Yelton's resignation.

Aaron Blake covers national politics and writes regularly for The Fix.

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