The Washington Post

Obama’s uncle contradicts White House, says Obama stayed with him in 1980s

President Obama's uncle said at a deportation hearing Tuesday that Obama stayed with him while he was a student at Harvard Law School in the 1980s -- despite the White House having said that Obama never met the man.

Onyango “Omar” Obama, 69, was arrested for drunk driving in 2011 and faced deportation after living in the United States for five decades. The judge decided to let the Kenyan national remain in the United States.

According to the Boston Globe, Omar Obama also made the following claim:

And this from landlord Alfred Ouma, who served as a witness at the hearing:

The White House said following Omar Obama's arrest that he and the president had never met. The president was not close to his father's side of the family given his father's absence in his life.

The White House has not commented on Omar Obama's claim.

Omar Obama came to the United States when he was 19, with the help of his brother, Barack Obama Sr. He currently works as the manager of a liquor store.

He is the second of Obama's relatives to face deportation and win. Obama's aunt, Zeituni Onyango, also avoided deportation in 2010.

RELATED:  Obama's younger years -- What did (and didn't) he do? 


Aaron Blake covers national politics and writes regularly for The Fix.



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Aaron Blake · December 3, 2013

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