The Washington Post

Grimes says in ad she ‘won’t answer’ to the president

Kentucky Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes (D) is hitting the airwaves with her first general election TV ad, a minute-long spot in which she casts herself as candidate not beholden to either her party or the president.

"I believe that we need a senator who puts partisanship aside and works with both Democrats and Republicans to do what's right for Kentucky and for our country," says Grimes. "And no matter who the president is, I won't answer to them. I'll only answer to you."

Grimes does not mention she is a Democrat in the ad. The commercial will air statewide and is backed by a six-figure buy, Grimes's campaign said.

Republicans have been working to tie her to national party figures. A group backing Grimes's opponent, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R), this week released a commercial that seeks to tie Grimes to President Obama, who is very unpopular in Kentucky.

On Tuesday, both McConnell and Grimes easily won their primaries.

Sean Sullivan has covered national politics for The Washington Post since 2012.

The Freddie Gray case

Please provide a valid email address.

You’re all set!

Campaign 2016 Email Updates

Please provide a valid email address.

You’re all set!
Comments
Show Comments
The New Hampshire primary is Tuesday. Get caught up on the race.
The Post's Dan Balz says ...
This was supposed to be the strongest Republican presidential field in memory, but cracks are showing. At Saturday night's debate, Marco Rubio withered in the face of unyielding attacks from Chris Christie, drawing attention to the biggest question about his candidacy: Is he ready to be president? How much the debate will affect Rubio's standing Tuesday is anybody's guess. But even if he does well, the question about his readiness to serve as president and to go up against Clinton, if she is the Democratic nominee, will linger.
Listen
Play Video
New Hampshire polling averages
Donald Trump holds a commanding lead in the next state to vote, but Marco Rubio has recently seen a jump in his support, according to polls.
New Hampshire polling averages
A victory in New Hampshire revitalized Hillary Clinton's demoralized campaign in 2008. But this time, she's trailing Bernie Sanders, from neighboring Vermont. She left the state Sunday to go to Flint, Mich., where a cost-saving decision led to poisonous levels of lead in the water of the poor, heavily black, rust-belt city. 
55% 40%
Listen
Play Video
Upcoming debates
Feb. 11: Democratic debate

on PBS, in Wisconsin

Feb 13: GOP debate

on CBS News, in South Carolina

Feb. 25: GOP debate

on CNN, in Houston, Texas

Campaign 2016
State of the race

To keep reading, please enter your email address.

You’ll also receive from The Washington Post:
  • A free 6-week digital subscription
  • Our daily newsletter in your inbox

Please enter a valid email address

I have read and agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy.

Please indicate agreement.

Thank you.

Check your inbox. We’ve sent an email explaining how to set up an account and activate your free digital subscription.