The Washington Post

Republican opponent asks prosecutors to investigate Landrieu’s residency

Sen. Mary Landrieu. (Rex C. Curry/For The Washington Post)

One of Sen. Mary Landrieu's Republican opponents filed formal complaints Friday with local prosecutors to investigate whether the Louisiana Democrat meets the state's legal residency qualifications to be on the ballot in November's midterm elections.

Rob Maness, a tea party-aligned insurgent candidate for Senate, said he sent written complaints on Friday to the district attorneys in four Louisiana parishes. His challenge comes a day after The Washington Post reported that Landrieu does not have a home of her own in Louisiana.

Landrieu is registered to vote at her parents' home in New Orleans, which she claims as her primary residence. The senator and her husband live in a $2.5 million brick manse on Capitol Hill in Washington, although she and her eight siblings share ownership of the New Orleans home with their parents through a limited liability corporation.

The home where Sen. Mary Landrieu is registered to vote and where her parents, Moon and Verna Landrieu, live in New Orleans. (Credit: Philip Rucker/ The Washington Post)

Louisiana Election Code states that a U.S. senator must be "an inhabitant of Louisiana when elected." Maness is calling on local prosecutors to investigate whether Landrieu satisfies that requirement.

"The Constitution, Louisiana law and common-sense says candidates for Senate have to live here when they qualify -- all of the evidence shows that Mary Landrieu doesn't live here," Maness said in a statement provided to The Post. "Election Code empowers our District Attorneys to object to a candidate's qualification when presented with evidence. There is no question that compelling and overwhelming evidence has now been presented. The most appropriate way to resolve this is to have the law upheld by the proper authorities."

A Landrieu campaign spokesman did not immediately respond Friday afternoon to a request for comment on Maness' allegations.

On Thursday, Landrieu issued a statement to The Post saying, "I have lived at my home on Prieur Street most of my life and I live there now, when not fulfilling my duties in Washington or serving constituents across the state."

Maness said he filed his complaints to the district attorneys in: Orleans Parish, where the Landrieu family home is located; East Baton Rouge Parish, where Landrieu submitted her election qualifying forms last week; and St. Tammany and Ouachita parishes, where Maness says local tax assessment records list Landrieu's home address as being in Washington.


Philip Rucker is a national political correspondent for The Washington Post, where he has reported since 2005.



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