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DNC chair: ‘Scott Walker has given women the back of his hand’


Debbie Wasserman Schultz (AP Photo)

Democratic National Committee Chair Debbie Wasserman Schultz (D-Fla.) criticized Wisconsin Republican Gov. Scott Walker's record on women's issues Wednesday by likening them to an act of violence.

"Scott Walker has given women the back of his hand. I know that is stark. I know that is direct. But that is reality," Wasserman Schultz said in an appearance at the Milwaukee Athletic Club, according to the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

The remark was swiftly met with heavy criticism.

Walker's campaign spokeswoman pointed to a response by Lieutenant Gov. Rebecca Kleefisch (R).

"I think [Wasserman-Schultz's] remarks were absolutely hideous and the motive behind them was despicable," Kleefisch said, according to the Journal Sentinel. 

Walker's Democratic opponent, former Trek executive Mary Burke, also denounced the comments.

"That's not the type of language that Mary Burke would use, or has used, to point out the clear differences in this contest," spokeswoman Stephanie Wilson said, according to the Journal Sentinel.

In a statement, DNC spokeswoman Lily Adams said, "Domestic violence is an incredibly serious issue and the Congresswoman was by no means belittling the very real pain survivors experience. That's why Democrats have consistently supported the Violence Against Women Act and won’t take a lesson from the party that blocked and opposed its reauthorization. The fact of the matter is that Scott Walker’s policies have been bad for Wisconsin’s women.”

Sean Sullivan has covered national politics for The Washington Post since 2012.

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