It's Congress against the White House once again. The fight over the pipeline is a potential political victory for Republicans and Democrats. (Pamela Kirkland/The Washington Post)

The House passed a bill to approve construction of the Keystone XL oil pipeline Wednesday, setting the stage for the first veto showdown of the new Congress with President Obama.

On a 270-152 vote that fell mostly along party lines, the House approved the bill, which has already cleared the Senate. The measure will now head to Obama's desk. The president has vowed to veto the measure.

Only one Republican, Rep. Justin Amash (Mich.), voted against the bill. Amash, a libertarian-leaning member, frequently clashes with GOP leadership.

Twenty-nine Democrats crossed over to vote for the pipeline.

Republicans have touted the bill as a job creator, while many Democrats have warned of adverse effects construction of the pipeline -- which would run from Canada to the U.S. Gulf Coast -- would have on the environment.

The Senate and House votes suggest that Republicans will not have the numbers to override Obama's veto. Two-thirds of both chambers would have to reject Obama's veto to overrule it.

The Senate passed the bill by a 62-36 margin.


A depot used to store pipes for Transcanada Corp's planned Keystone XL oil pipeline is seen in Gascoyne, North Dakota in this November 14, 2014 file photo. (REUTERS/Andrew Cullen/Files)