In his first comments since the Justice Department released a report earlier this week detailing racial bias in the Ferguson, Mo., police department, President Obama called Friday for "collective action and mobilization" to resolve tensions between minority communities and law enforcement.

"I think that there are circumstances in which trust between communities and law enforcement have broken down, and individuals or entire departments may not have the training or the accountability to make sure that they're protecting and serving all people and not just some,” he said on the Joe Madison Radio Show on Sirius XM Friday. "...I don't think that is typical of what happens across the country, but it's not an isolated incident.”

The Justice Department cleared officer Darren Wilson in a Ferguson, Mo., civil rights probe, but in a separate report, the agency accused the police department of bias and cited offensive e-mails. (The Washington Post)

Ahead of a commemoration of the civil rights movement this weekend in Selma, Ala., Obama later called the civil rights movement “an unfinished project," pointing specifically to existing tensions in communities such as Ferguson, and in New York City.

“This was a quintessentially American moment," he said on the Tom Joyner radio show of the march from Selma to Montgomery. "America at its best is about its capacity for change and not just denying problems but taking them head on. America at its best is also about ordinary people, we the people, making change.”

Obama added that too frequently people think of the civil rights movement as a distant, historic moment when in fact “this was just yesterday, basically.”

“Part of what I want Malia and Sasha to understand is that this an unfinished project,” Obama told Joyner. “There is work to be done right now. ... It is a glorious task we are given to continually try to improve this country of ours. And we shouldn’t shy away from that work, and we shouldn’t be complacent about it.”