A heckler protesting U.S. immigration policy was removed during President Obama address at a White House reception in celebration of Pride month. (AP)

President Obama had just begun his remarks Wednesday celebrating civil rights gains for LGBT Americans when a rare White House heckler broke in.

As a former community organizer, Obama is comfortable with rowdy crowds. He's also remarkably tolerant of interruptions. This time he wasn't hearing it.

"I am just fine with a few hecklers, but not when I'm up in the house," he said, smiling broadly.  "You know what I mean?"

"I do," replied Vice President Biden, who clapped Obama on the back and burst out in laughter.

"You know, my attitude is if you're eating the hors d'oeuvres," said Obama, "and drinking the booze. ... Anyway, where was I?"

In this case, the heckler was an undocumented transgender woman protesting the United States' immigration policies. As she was being escorted out of the room, a press release was blasted to the media explaining her outburst.

The president gamely continued with his speech before an overwhelmingly friendly crowd.

"We love you!" someone screamed.

"I love you back," Obama replied.

The heckler was gone. The crowd was now quiet. Obama began touting his administration's work on behalf of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender Americans at the event held in support of LGBT Pride Month. "A lot of what we've accomplished has been because of you," he said. The list of president's accomplishments included ending the policy that prohibited gays from openly serving in the military, lifting the HIV entry ban and passing a hate crimes bill aimed at protecting LGBT Americans.

"And, of course, we're now awaiting the Supreme Court's ruling on whether same-sex couples nationwide have the equal right to marry," Obama said."There are a few decisions coming down these next few days that I'm paying close attention to. But however the decision comes down on the marriage issue, one thing is undeniable — there has been this incredible shift in attitudes across the country."

Two big court decisions on same sex marriage and the Affordable Care Act — both affecting millions of Americans — are expected in the next few days.