With a colorful White House backdrop, (L) Kevin Barragan and his partner Adam Smith celebrate as do Kelly Miller (with glasses) and her wife Lindsey Miller. The Millers were married two years ago in Washington state where gay marriage is legal. The White House was lit in multi-colored lights to honor the Supreme Court decision to allow gay marriage, on June 26, 2015. (Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post)

For Obama. seeing the White House illuminated in rainbow colors Friday night "was a moment worth savoring."

Speaking at a joint news conference Tuesday with Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff, Obama made a point of saying just before leaving that one of the best aspects of last week was viewing the crowds who had gathered in front of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue to celebrate the symbol of gay pride on full display.

[The White House turned into a rainbow Friday night (Video)]

Aditi Hardikar, the LGBT liaison in the White House Office of Public Engagement, first floated the idea of lighting up the residence a few weeks ago, and White House senior advisers Valerie Jarrett and Tina Tchen worked with outside groups to pull off the move.

"I had a chance to do the Rose Garden celebration of the court decision around same-sex marriage," the president told CNN's Jim Acosta. "I did not have a chance to comment on how good the White House looked in rainbow colors. That made it a really good week. To see people gathered in an evening outside on a beautiful summer night, and to feel whole, and to feel accepted, and to feel that they had a right to love, that was pretty cool."

"That was a good thing," Obama said, pausing for a moment. "That was a good thing."

[READ: How the rainbow-lit White House came to be]

"And the only bad part about it was I couldn't go out and peek at it for myself, because then I would have had to clear out all the people, or the Secret Service would have," the president added. "So I could only reflect on it from a television screen. That's a moment worth savoring."

Still, Obama declined to call the week of June 22 his "best week ever," when prompted by Acosta.

"In terms of my best week, now my best week, I will tell you, was marrying Michelle. That was a really good week. Malia and Sasha being born, excellent weeks," the president said.

"Good you remember those," a reporter interjected.

"Yes. There was a game where I scored 27 points," Obama said, prompting laughter. "That was a pretty good week."

Speaking at the White House Friday, President Obama said the day's Supreme Court ruling on same-sex marriage made "our union a little more perfect." Here are his full remarks. (AP)