Former Republican vice presidential nominee Sarah Palin arrives to speak at the annual Conservative Political Action Conference at National Harbor, Md., on Feb. 5. (Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images)

Sarah Palin thinks she would make a great secretary of the U.S. Energy Department because as a former governor of Alaska she knows a thing or two about "oil and gas and minerals."

But she would not stay in the job for long if Republican candidate Donald Trump won the presidency and asked her to serve. The businessman and reality TV show star has said that he would "love" to have Palin in his administration "because she really is somebody that knows what’s happening. And she’s a special person."

[Sarah Palin would be welcome in a Trump administration, the billionaire says]

Palin, during an interview Sunday on CNN's "State of the Union," said: "I think a lot about the Department of Energy, because energy is my baby ... And if I were head of that, I would get rid of it. And I would let the states start having more control over the lands that are within their boundaries and the people who are affected by the developments within their space."

"So, you know, if I were in charge of that, it would be a short-term job. But it would be — it would be really great to have someone who knows energy and is pro-responsible development to be in charge," she said.

Palin, a former governor of Alaska, touted her knowledge of "oil and gas and minerals, those things that God has dumped on this part of the Earth for mankind's use, instead of relying on unfriendly foreign nations for us to import their resources."

Actually, that knowledge would serve her better as secretary of the Department of the Interior, which manages natural resources on land and offshore. The Department of Energy states that its mission is to "ensure America’s security and prosperity by addressing its energy, environmental and nuclear challenges through transformative science and technology solutions."

[Donald Trump, Sarah Palin and the history of 'gotcha' questions]

Palin, who was the Republican vice presidential nominee in 2008, also took a swipe at President Obama, who visited Alaska last week and chronicled the trip with photos on Instagram that he took himself. Palin dismissed the trip as "pretty much a tourism jaunt, really" because he did not push back on what she called "messages" being sent by Russia and China. For instance, the Pentagon confirmed last week that a group of Chinese naval vessels had transited U.S. territorial waters near Alaska.

"How about while he was up here, he had, as a president, carried a big stick, instead of a selfie stick. He could start publicly berating these countries that are sticking it to us with the messages that they are sending," Palin said.