Jeb Bush will return to New Hampshire on Tuesday to pitch his plan for repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act -- an approach that includes providing a tax credit for purchasing health plans and upping limits on contributions to health savings accounts.

The former Florida governor's decision to give the speech highlights the sharp resistance to the law that remains in the Republican Party, even after the Supreme Court upheld it and GOP efforts in Congress to shred it have fallen flat.

Ahead of the Republican hopeful's Tuesday morning speech at the New Hampshire Institute of Politics, Bush's campaign said his plan would do three things: "promote innovation," "lower costs" and "return power to states."

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Bush's plan would "provide a tax credit for the purchase of affordable, portable health plans that protect Americans from high-cost medical events," according to his campaign, and it would "increase contribution limits and uses for Health Savings Accounts to help with out of-pocket costs." The campaign did not provide more details about the credit or what the new contribution caps would be.

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The plan also calls for increasing funding to the National Institutes of Health; reviewing regulations seen as "barriers" to innovation; capping "the employer tax exclusion to lower insurance premiums;" and enabling "small businesses to make tax-free contributions to their workers’ individual, portable health plans," the Bush campaign said.

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The campaign did not provide any information about Bush's tactical plan for repealing the health-care law. Republicans control the House and Senate but lack a super-majority in the upper chamber, making repeal a difficult proposition. What's more, the law's provisions have already been in effect for years and trying to undo them could prove politically costly for a Republican president.

Under Bush's plan, states would get capped federal funding and be responsible for a "transition plan" for individuals "entangled" in the law, his campaign said.

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