At a bipartisan convention on Oct. 12, 2015, Donald Trump fielded a question from impassioned college student Lauren Batchelder about women's rights and equal pay. (No Labels Problem Solver Convention)

MANCHESTER, N.H. — One of the most memorable questions that Donald Trump took during a bipartisan convention here on Monday came from a college student.

"So, maybe I'm wrong, maybe you can prove me wrong," said Lauren Batchelder, a student at St. Anselm College in Manchester. "But I don't think you're a friend to women."

Trump launched into his defense, one that he has given a lot lately as he faces accusations that he doesn't treat women with respect. Trump said he gave women positions of power at his construction sites "many years ago... before anyone would have even thought" to put women in such jobs. Trump complimented his wife, eldest daughter and mother, who he said "was one of the great people of the world." He promised to "take care of women" and stated: "I love women, I respect women, I cherish women."

[Meet Melania Trump, a new model for first lady]

Batchelder listened with her arms folded, face in a scowl. She then finished asking her question: "If you become president, will a woman make the same as a man, and do I get to choose what I do with my body?"

After the crowd cheered, Trump answered quickly and curtly: "You're going to make the same if you do as good of a job, and I happen to be pro-life, okay?" Batchelder listened, her hands now on her hips.

As Trump supporters googled Batchelder's name, they found a resume listing "intern at Jeb Bush for President 2016" and a Twitter feed containing pro-Bush tweets. Daniel Scavino Jr., a senior adviser to Trump, accused Bush of having "planted" an intern at the event. Conservative blogs quickly picked up the story.

And Trump weighed in Tuesday morning:

Allie Brandenburger, a spokeswoman for Bush's campaign, said Batchelder is not a paid staff member and attended the convention on her own.

"While this question was not sanctioned by the campaign," Brandenburger said in an e-mail Tuesday morning, "we can't help but notice Mr. Trump does seem to be very sensitive about being challenged by women."

Bush's lead spokesman, Tim Miller, reiterated that sentiment in a tweet.

[Donald Trump plots his second act]

Batchelder appears to have deleted her Twitter account. She has yet to respond to requests for comment.