Republican presidential candidate Jeb Bush speaks to voters at a town hall meeting campaign stop at Colby-Sawyer College in New London, N.H., on Feb. 3. (Mike Segar/Reuters)

Republican presidential candidate Jeb Bush takes a subtle swipe at his opponents in his latest television ad airing across New Hampshire.

"Backbone" hit airwaves today and will be airing through the GOP primary next Tuesday, according to campaign aides.

The new message is a more intimate appeal to voters compared to a two-minute ad that directly attacks GOP front-runner Donald Trump and also started airing Wednesday.

"The question is, what kind of president do you want?" Republican presidential candidate Jeb Bush asks in an ad airing across New Hampshire. (Jeb Bush)

"The question is, what kind of president do you want? Do you want a president that has a backbone? You want a president that will actually stand on principle and fight for what he believes in?" he asks. "Or do you want a president that's all about them, where their ambition drives everything? I've seen how it's done the right way and I've seen how it's done the wrong way. I believe that I would have the steady hand to be able to be a commander-in-chief that you'd be proud of. I know how to do this."

Bush's knock on opponents who make it "all about them" could apply to any number of rivals, especially Trump and Sens. Ted Cruz (R-Tex.) and Marco Rubio (R-Fla.), who Bush has dismissed in recent days as "back-benchers" with little legislative accomplishment.

The Bush team budgeted about $4.5 million for TV ads in the Granite State, the only place where it is spending heavily on television ad time. Right to Rise USA, a super PAC backing Bush's bid, plans to spend more than $20 million on advertising across the state.

Fresh polling in the last 24 hours shows Bush remaining competitive here. He's running second to Trump in a Harper Polling survey released Wednesday. He ranks fourth in a daily tracking poll published Wednesday by WHDH-TV and UMass Amherst. In both polls, however, Bush and his nearest competitors are all within the margin of error, suggesting that the primary remains an incredibly tight race.