Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders stands with his wife, Jane Sanders, during a campaign rally at Grand View University in Des Moines, Iowa. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

APPROACHING BURLINGTON, Vt. -- Jane Sanders, the wife of Democratic presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders, is a near-constant traveling companion these days and has made a habit of making her way to the back of the campaign’s chartered jet to visit with the traveling press.

The sessions have been off the record, until Monday night, when Jane Sanders decided to share her thoughts on the campaign more freely. It’s not an altogether unfamiliar role. During the candidate’s congressional career, his wife at times has temporarily filled staff vacancies, and she is a highly trusted adviser on the campaign, with input into advertising content and other decisions.

Here are some excerpts from what Jane Sanders had to say on the eve of Super Tuesday, when Bernie Sanders will face off with Hillary Clinton in 11 states with primaries and caucuses.

On the outlook for Tuesday’s contests

Tomorrow, you know, it’s a rough map for us. … The national media, gathered here today, didn’t really start covering Bernie much until the beginning of 2016, so they’re not as familiar with him in the South and across the country, (and) we have a lot of Southern states. We think that we’re going to split the votes tomorrow, split the states, so we’re feeling good about that.

I just read [MSNBC’s “Hardball” host] Chris Matthews was saying, if (Bernie) wins three states he’s doing good, if he wins four or five states he’s doing very good. You know, I don’t know. I’m hopeful for better.

On the outlook beyond Super Tuesday

I think one one of the things is time is on our side now. Time has been against us. … What we found is we’re in an enviable position that the more they hear (Bernie), the more they listen to his message, the more they know him, they more support him as a person and him as a candidate to be president. So now we move forward to the rest of the states.

On whether there’s a point at which her husband drops out of the race

If you’ve gone to the rallies with us, you’ve seen the hope and the expectation, the fervor and the support for the ideas. Bernie’s not going to let those people down. Every state should be able to voice their support for what they believe in.

Now, we we know there’s a significant amount of support for what Bernie stands for and for him as a candidate for president. We don’t know yet if it’s a majority, but we won’t know tomorrow either. … We will see what happens as time goes on. We want to give people the opportunity to continue to focus on the issues and also to have the media and the other candidates focus on the issues we consider to be important. As he says all the time, it’s not about Bernie, it’s about the issues. No matter what happens with this presidential race, after the convention, those issues and Bernie, they’re not going away.

On whether her husband has gotten tougher on Hillary Clinton

I think he’s just being more clear. We’re hearing from people as we go to the rallies, ‘We love you, we support you, but please distinguish your record because she’s saying you two are the same, and we know you’re not.’ And so we’re just making it clear. I don’t think it’s being tougher on Secretary Clinton. I think it’s contrasting the facts, only the facts. There’s nothing negative about it.

On whether her husband has gotten tougher on Hillary Clinton

I think he’s just being more clear. We’re hearing from people as we go to the rallies, ‘We love you, we support you, but please distinguish your record because she’s saying you two are the same, and we know you’re not.’ And so we’re just making it clear. I don’t think it’s being tougher on Secretary Clinton. I think it’s contrasting the facts, only the facts. There’s nothing negative about it.

On whether the campaign has made mistakes in strategy

Of course you’re going to have some missteps as you go along, and you need to be thinking. I would have like to have had more opportunity to just camp out down in South Carolina so they could know him. That wasn’t an option. … We needed to be in Iowa, we needed to be in New Hampshire, we needed to be in Nevada, then we needed to be in South Carolina. It’s just timing. Time was the enemy for this part, but as we move forward, people are seeing, they’re having a foundation presented to them now nationally about who Bernie is and what he stands for and what he’s trying to accomplish and how he’s trying to transform America. So now we can make the personal connections.

On whether Bernie Sanders staying in the race could wind up helping Donald Trump

No, no, no. If we were a candidate that was running the traditional way in terms of negative politics and tearing down his opponents and questioning character and demonizing their opponents, that might be a problem. Bernie doesn’t do that. He believes what we need to do is give people something to vote for. … In fact, I think his participating in this process actually will hurt Donald Trump and you will see it as we go along.