The marriage of political convenience between Ohio Gov. John Kasich (R) and Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Tex.) was tested less than 12 hours into the honeymoon, as Kasich told reporters that he still wanted votes from his supporters in Indiana.

"I’ve never told 'em not to vote for me," Kasich told reporters at a campaign stop in Philadelphia. "They ought to vote for me. But I'm not over there campaigning and spending resources."

Just hours earlier, Kasich's campaign co-chair in Indiana was saying the opposite.  "Kasich is asking his supporters in Indiana to vote for Cruz so Trump does not win Indiana," Carmel Mayor Jim Brainard Cruz told the Indianapolis Star, suggesting that Cruz would do the same with his voters in Oregon and New Mexico.

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In fact, the deal — announced in separate news releases by the two campaigns last night — said nothing about what the candidates' voters should do. "Our campaign will focus its time and resources in Indiana and in turn clear the path for Gov. Kasich to compete in Oregon and New Mexico," Cruz campaign chairman Jeff Roe said last night. And at a news conference today, Cruz made no additional comments about what his supporters in those states, which assign delegates proportionately, should do.

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Kasich's disinterest in telling his voters to stand down might have been expected. In March, after Mitt Romney encouraged Ohio voters to back Kasich but Florida voters to back Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.), Kasich did not tell his own Florida supporters to stand down. As Rubio struggled to make up ground against Trump, Cruz made several campaign visits to the state; Kasich avoided it.

In Philadelphia, an occasionally testy Kasich portrayed the new deal as a simple matter of economics.

"We don’t have all the resources in the world, but we’re still going," Kasich said. "And we have to husband our resources."

Cruz was spending the rest of Monday and Tuesday stumping in the Hoosier state. Kasich, having canceled two planned events there, was heading to Maryland before a Monday evening campaign stop in his hometown of McKees Rocks, near Pittsburgh.

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