Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump's campaign raised just $3.1 million in May, while Democratic rival Hillary Clinton brought in $27 million. Here's a breakdown of the two campaigns' finances. (Jenny Starrs/The Washington Post)

Donald Trump, the presumptive Republican nominee for president, raised just $5.4 million in May, including $2.2 million that he loaned his campaign. Almost as startling was how little Trump had in the bank when June began: less than $1.3 million.

Where did it go? The real estate mogul does not have much of a ground operation yet or a significant paid media effort. But he managed to shell out $6.7 million last month, including more than $1 million in payments to Trump companies or to reimburse his family for travel expenses. Here are some of the campaign's biggest expenditures.

Campaign swag and printing: $958,836

About a dozen companies were paid for hats, pens, T-shirts, mugs, stickers and printing services.

Air charters: $838,774

Nearly $350,000 of the money spent on private jets went to Trump's own TAG Air.

Event staging and rentals: $830,482

This includes the fees for renting facilities such as the Anaheim Convention Center ($43,000) and the Fresno Convention Center ($24,715). But the biggest sum went to Trump's own Mar-a-Lago Club in Palm Beach, Fla., which was paid $423,317 for rental and catering. The Trump National Golf Club in Jupiter, Fla., got $35,845, while the Trump International Golf Club in West Palm Beach, Fl., was paid $29,715. His son Eric Trump's wine company received nearly $4,000.


The Trump campaign spent nearly a half-million dollars at Trump's Mar-a-Lago Club in Palm Beach, Fl. (Mary Jordan/The Washington Post)

Payroll and consultants: $684,337

Trump had less than 70 people on staff in May, versus Hillary Clinton's 683. But his top aides were paid well: now-departed campaign manager Corey Lewandowski and deputy campaign manager Michael Glassner each received $20,000 for the month, while the firm of Dan Scavino, director of social media, got nearly $21,000. Eli Miller, who came aboard as the chief operating officer in mid-May, was paid $13,038.

Data and technology: $603,143

Giles-Parscale, a San Antonio-based Web-design firm that began working for Trump's companies in 2011, received two big payments totaling $543,000.

Direct mail and telemarketing: $253,969

The bulk of the payments went to a Purcellville, Va.-based company called Left Hand Enterprises, which was registered in Delaware in late April by an incorporation service. It is unclear who owns it.